Taking The Petro Out Of The Dollar

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Saudi Arabia has been in the news recently for several interconnected reasons. Underlying it all is a spendthrift country that is rapidly becoming insolvent. While the House of Saud remains strongly resistant to change, a mixture of reality and power-play is likely to dominate domestic politics in the coming years, following the ascendency of King Salman to the Saudi throne. This has important implications for the dollar, given its historic role in the region.

Last year’s collapse in the oil price has forced financial reality upon the House of Saud. The young deputy crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, possibly inspired by a McKinsey report, aims to diversify the state rapidly from oil dependency into a mixture of industries, healthcare and tourism. The McKinsey report looks like a wish-list, rather than reality, particularly when it comes to tourism. The religious police are unlikely to take kindly to bikinis on the Red Sea’s beeches, or to foreign women in mini-shorts wandering around Jeddah.

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More Productive Than Cash?

By Axel Merk – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Is gold, often scoffed at as being an unproductive asset, more productive than cash? If so, what does it mean for asset allocation?

There are investors that stay away from investing in gold because it is an ‘unproductive’ asset: the argument points out gold doesn’t have an intrinsic return, it doesn’t pay a dividend. Some go as far as arguing investing in gold isn’t patriotic because it suggests an investor prefers to buy something unproductive rather than investing into a real business. In many ways, it is intriguing that a shiny piece of precious metal raises emotions; today, we explore why that is the case.

Investing is about returns…
Each investor has their own preference in determining asset and sector allocations. Some investors prefer to stay away from the tobacco, defense or fossil fuel industry. During times of war, countries have issued bonds calling upon the patriotism of citizens to support the cause. At its core, however, investing, in our assessment, boils down to returns; more specifically, risk-adjusted returns. The “best” company in the world may not be worth investing in if its price is too high. Similarly, there may be lots of value in a beaten down company leading to statements suggesting profitable investments may be found “when there’s blood on the street.”

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Mercatus Study: Govt Regulations Have Cost US Economy $4 Trillion

By F McGuire – Re-Blogged From http://www.newsmax.com

The cost of U.S. regulations is larger than Germany’s economy, amounting to a $4 trillion loss to the American economy, the Free Beacon reported.

The study by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University found that regulations over the past several decades amount to a loss of $13,000 for each American worker, the Free Beacon reported.

“The impact of regulation on economic growth has been widely studied, but most research has focused on a narrow set of regulations, industries, or both,” the report stated. “These studies typically rely on regulatory indexes that measure subsets of all regulation, on country-to-country comparisons, on short time spans, or on surveys in which experts report how regulated they believe their country or industry is,” the report said. Continue reading

80-Year Old Thwarts Robbers

By Onan Coca – Re-Blogged From Eagle Rising

Once again, the inalienable right to self-defense comes in handy for an innocent American citizen.

Just last week, an 80-year old man in Fairmont, West Virginia, was awoken in the middle of the night by someone knocking on his front door. Wisely, he answered the door with a concealed firearm. Upon opening the door, a young woman begged to use his phone and was quickly followed into the house by two seemingly armed thugs. The men brandished their weapons and threatened the elderly man while informing him that he was being robbed. However, this was no shrinking violet they were dealing with, and the man swiftly pulled his own weapon and opened fire.

Three of the four shots connected with their intended targets and the elderly homeowner then contacted the police. When the authorities arrived they found the elderly man waiting in front of his home with the bodies of two of the tree intruders. One, 28-year old Larry Shaver was dead from a gunshot to the head, the other, John Grossklaus, had been incapacitated by a gunshot to the abdomen.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #223

The Week That Was: April 23, 2016 – Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Three Groups: MIT Professor Emeritus of Meteorology Richard Lindzen is featured in a very clear four-minute video explaining the ongoing conflicts regarding the human influence on global warming, (now called climate change), primarily from emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). He divides the participants into three groups: 1) knowable scientists who largely agree with the findings of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and its 5 assessment reports (ARs); 2) knowable scientists who largely disagree with the findings of the IPCC that burning of fossil fuels may cause dangerous global warming, and 3) politicians, environmentalists, and the media. [It should be noted that a number of scientists in group 2 participated in earlier IPCC reports, including Mr. Lindzen, and departed from it. Some stated that the IPCC has become too politicized.]

Lindzen notes that the two groups of scientists who disagree on the effects of burning of fossil fuels largely agree on a surprising number of points.

· The climate is always changing.

· CO2 is a greenhouse gas without which life on earth is not possible, but adding it to the atmosphere should lead to some warming.

· Atmospheric levels of CO2 have been increasing since the end of the Little Ice Age in the 19th century.

· Over the past two centuries, the global mean temperature has increased slightly and erratically by about 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit or one degree Celsius.

· Given the complexity of climate, no confident prediction about future global mean temperature or its impact can be made.

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China: Still the World’s Number One Heavy Metal Rock Star

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

I want to begin with a quote from a recent Cornerstone Macro report that succinctly summarizes the research firm’s view on growth prospects in emerging markets, China specifically. Emphasis is my own:

Our most out-of-consensus call this year is the belief that China, and by extension many emerging markets, will see a cyclical recovery in 2016. We understand the bearish case for emerging markets on a multiyear basis quite well, but we also recognize that in a given year, any stock, sector or region can have a cyclical rebound if the conditions are right. In fact, we’ve already seen leading indicators of economic activity and earnings perk up in 2016 as PMIs have rebounded in many areas of the world. That is all it takes for markets, from equities to CDS, to respond more favorably as overly pessimistic views get rerated. And like in most cyclical recoveries that take place in a regime of structural headwinds, we don’t expect it to last beyond a few quarters.

There’s a lot to unpack here, but I’ll say upfront that Cornerstone’s analysis is directly in line with our own, especially where the purchasing managers’ index (PMI) is concerned. China’s March PMI reading, at 49.7, was not only at its highest since February 2015 but it also crossed above its three-month moving average—a clear bullish signal, as I explained in-depth in January.

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Seven Earth Day Predictions that Failed Spectacularly

By Andrew Follett – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Never Trust The Doom-Mongers: Earth Day Predictions That Were All Wrong

EarthDay_Envorinmental_Scares
The Daily Caller, 22 April 2016

Andrew Follett

Environmentalists truly believed and predicted that the planet was doomed during the first Earth Day in 1970, unless drastic actions were taken to save it. Humanity never quite got around to that drastic action, but environmentalists still recall the first Earth Day fondly and hold many of the predictions in high regard.
So this Earth Day, The Daily Caller News Foundation takes a look at predictions made by environmentalists around the original Earth Day in 1970 to see how they’ve held up.
Have any of these dire predictions come true? No, but that hasn’t stopped environmentalists from worrying. From predicting the end of civilization to classic worries about peak oil, here are seven green predictions that were just flat out wrong.

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