WikiLeaks Exposes How Most Mainstream Media is Controlled by Council on Foreign Relations

By Matt Agorist – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

It is no secret that over the last 4 decades, mainstream media has been consolidated from dozens of competing companies to only six. Hundreds of channels, websites, news outlets, newspapers, and magazines, making up ninety percent of all media is controlled by very few people—giving Americans the illusion of choice.

While six companies controlling most everything the Western world consumes in regard to media may sound like a sinister arrangement, the Swiss Propaganda Research center (SPR) has just released information that is even worse.

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ATMs Hit By Malware “Jackpotting” Attacks That Dispense All Cash In Minutes

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

ATMs in US hit by “jackpotting” attacks that empty ATMs in minutes
– FBI warns of attacks in US after similar crimes in Taiwan, Thailand and Europe

– Hackers have stolen c.$1 million from ATMs across the US warns U.S. Secret Service
– Target Diebold Nixdorf machines – #1 global ATM provider, 35% of ATMs worldwide
– Digital deposits increasingly vulnerable – Time to save in physical gold

Source: TechViral.net

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Russia Revisits an Old Cold War Battleground

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • The Wagner Group, a private military company with ties to the Kremlin, may secure military contracts in Sudan and the Central African Republic.
  • Military engagement with Russia will enable Sudan to maintain a greater balance in its foreign policy.
  • Entering the Central African Republic will allow the Kremlin to earn more cash and drum up more business across the continent.

Decades after competing for influence on the continent with the United States and its allies, Russia is taking a renewed interest in Africa.

(gabriel_bostan/iStock)

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On the Precautionary Principle

By Neil Lock – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to look at a mantra much trumpeted by environmentalists; the precautionary principle. I’ll seek to make a case that, since the early 1980s, this idea has been perverted. To such an extent, that the principle now has an effect all but opposite to its true intention. I’ll trace how this happened, and try to outline how we might fix the resulting mess.

What is the precautionary principle?

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Resurgent US Oil Industry

By Rick Mills – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Crude oil prices dropped from $110 a barrel in the summer of 2014 to about $30 in January 2016. The effect on oil producers and oil-producing countries was dramatic. The Russian ruble plunged, and the Canadian dollar slipped to below 70 cents US for the first time since 2003, kicking the country into recession and snuffing out the oil boom in Alberta. Many foreign companies operating in the high-cost Canadian oil sands pulled up stakes.

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Frigid Cold is Why We Need Dependable Energy

Foreward By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The United States has more coal than any other nation. With modern coal-fired power plants, it can be used to generate very inexpensive electricity, with virtually no significant pollution: about the only thing that comes out of the stacks today are water vapor and carbon dioxide, the miracle molecule that helps plants grow and makes life on Earth possible. Even though coal-based electricity has plummeted from 52% of all US electricity in 2008 to 30% by the time President Obama left office, it still helps to keep the lights on and keep people warm in all but a few states.

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Unsound Money Is Crucifying Pensions

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Deficits are mounting in pension obligations. It is a global problem over which pension trustees are helpless. It is also a problem that’s brushed under the carpet, with prospective and current pensioners generally unaware of the threat to their retirement. Investors in companies with defined benefit schemes, schemes which promise an inflation-adjusted entitlement based on final salary, generally ignore this important issue, as do most stock market analysts. Analysts know the deficits are there, but so long as they are buried in the notes to the accounts and not actually represented in-your-face on balance sheets, the assumption appears to be they can ignore them.

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Resurgence of the American Coal Industry

By David Middleton -Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Is coal the new gold? A Pennsylvania senate candidate thinks so

By John Moody | Fox News

“There’s coal in them thar hills.” If that sounds like a confused reference to the 1849 California gold rush, think again. Long-ignored coal deposits in eastern Pennsylvania have become a key part of President Trump’s pledge to revitalize American mining and to once again produce critical materials needed for our national defense.

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Birds of Prey Deliberately Setting Wildfires

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

So much for fire control – JoNova reports that raptors have been photographed congregating on the edge of large Australian bushfires, picking up burning sticks, and deliberately setting new spot fires in advance of the main blaze to flush out small mammals and other prey. This discovery potentially has profound implications for fire management in places like California.

Black Kite (Milvus migrans)

Black Kite (Milvus migrans) – one of the species accused of setting fires. By Mayukhghose (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #300

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Fears of Global Warming: Last week’s TWTW brought up the well tested fact that all gases absorb radiant energy in certain bands of the electromagnet spectrum, including nitrogen, N2, which accounts for more than 77% of the atmosphere. Some gases absorb more energy than other gases, and in different bands. If adding carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere causes significant warming of the surface, it would be by a warming of the atmosphere from CO2 absorbing significant energy in the long-wave, infrared portion of the electromagnet spectrum, which is the range of electromagnet energy reflected by the earth into space.

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Netflix Expects to Report Loss to IRS, Will Burn $3-$4 Bn in 2018, after Burning $2 Bn in 2017

By Wolf Richter – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

Shares Soar. Bond market on cloud 9.

Wall Street gushed over Netflix’s “earnings” Monday after-hours, sending its shares up 8.5% to $246, from around $10 five years ago, giving it a market capitalization of over $100 billion for the first time. Actually, what everyone gushed over were the metrics that Netflix wants everyone to gush over, namely the number of subscribers that pay monthly fees and subscriber additions, and they’re growing. Revenues jumped 32% to $11.7 billion for the year 2017. And there were some gems in its earnings report today:

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Gold Upleg Breaking Out

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Gold’s strong upleg accelerated this week, powering to major new breakout highs. Speculators rushed to buy gold futures following surprising weak-dollar comments from the US Treasury Secretary, which hit the US dollar hard. That boosted gold to critical technical levels that should really intensify the shift back to bullish psychology. This mounting gold breakout confirms gold’s bull market is very much alive and well.

While this week’s surge put gold on many more traders’ radars, it has actually been picking up steam for 6 weeks now. Gold’s latest major interim low of $1242 came a couple days before the Fed’s latest rate hike in mid-December. The gold-futures speculators who dominate this metal’s short-term price action have always had a deep and irrational fear of Fed rate hikes. Historically gold has thrived in rate-hike cycles!

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Tracking Global Terrorism in 2018

Scott Stewart   Scott Stewart – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Editor’s Note

With the start of a new year, we once again examine the state of the global jihadist movement. Shared from Threat Lens, Stratfor’s unique protective intelligence product, the following column includes excerpts from a comprehensive forecast available to Threat Lens subscribers.

In some ways “the global jihadist movement” is a misleading phrase. Rather than the monolithic threat it describes, jihadism more closely resembles a worldwide insurgency with two competing standard-bearers: al Qaeda and the Islamic State. To make matters more complicated, grassroots extremists have been known to take inspiration from each group’s ideology — and, in some cases, both.

A Yemeni man surveys the aftermath of a bombing in Huta, in the southern province of Lahj, March 27, 2017.

(SALEH AL-OBEIDI/AFP/Getty Images)

 

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Inflation Tsunami Ahead

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From PentoPort

Inflation is one of the most misunderstood, misused and lied about topics in economics. The Fed professes to know what causes it: an overly employed workforce. But, perhaps it is aware this is false and intentionally promulgates the ruse of growth as inflation’s progenitor because central banks want to deflect attention away from its money printing. Nevertheless, one thing is abundantly clear, we all have to agree that the Fed can’t readily control the exact rate of inflation; nor can it direct what the repositories will be for its quantitative counterfeiting misadventures.

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Fed’s Policies About To Turn On Their Master

By Graham Summers – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The financial media is finally catching on to something we’ve been screaming about for years…

That the Fed’s preferred metric for measuring inflation is a complete joke.

Making matters more difficult, the Fed’s preferred inflation gauge does a pitiful job of capturing the quandary facing many households that live paycheck to paycheck. The so-called core PCE is the central bank’s go-to inflation metric. It is derived by netting out the necessities of food and energy from personal consumption expenditures. But the core PCE also minimizes the weight of rent and over-emphasizes health care due to Medicaid and Medicare’s inputs.

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Extremism of Stories Like ‘Bomb Cyclone’ is a Good Thing

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The “Bomb Cyclone” of 2018 is another example of hyperbole and distortion designed to scare the public and promote false perceptions.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration GOES-16 satellite caught a dramatic view of the ‘bomb cyclone’ moving up the East Coast on Jan. 4, 2017. NOAA Photo

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Banks Suffer 20 Percent Jump in Credit-Card Losses

By I McGuire – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

U.S. banks have reportedly recently suffered a 20 percent jump in credit card losses.

The soaring bad debts has fueled fear about the financial health of middle America, the Financial Times explained.

Recently disclosed results showed Citigroup, JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America and Wells Fargo took a combined $12.5 billion hit from soured card loans last year, about $2 billion more than a year ago. The FT reported.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #299

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week. All things are poison and nothing is without poison; only the dose makes a thing not a poison.” — Paracelsus, Swiss physician and chemist.

Number of the Week: More than 77%

Number Games – Models: If one uses models to describe the influence that changing any variable or component of the model may have on nature, or a human, it is important that the model accurately capture the processes involved. Far too frequently, government agencies abuse the use of models to justify the expansion of governmental powers, without regard to whether the model carefully fits the processes involved. One of the purposes of proper testing is to assure proper fit. A model frequently abused by the EPA to justify questionable policies is the Linear-No-Threshold model, which has a poor foundation in toxicology, the study of the nature, effects, and detection of poisons.

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Finding a Path to a Post-Revolutionary Iran

By Matthew Bey – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Almost four decades after the toppling of Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, a revolutionary ideology continues to underpin the Iranian state. As the years have passed, the relevance of its governing philosophy risks being lost on the country’s younger generations, and the internal and external challenges to its government continue to mount. The recent spate of demonstrations that quickly spread across the country highlighted one of the revolutionary state’s largest shortcomings: It is a 40-year-old revolution that has not arrived at a sustainable economic model.

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In the EU, East and West Are Falling Out of Tune

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Increasing nationalism and persistent graft in several Central and Eastern European countries could deepen the divide between western and eastern members of the European Union.
  • For countries in Central and Eastern Europe, the benefits of EU membership still outweigh the costs, but that may change.
  • A looming debate on the next EU budget will deliver a stern test to intra-bloc relations.

(iStock)

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Equities Within A (HYPER) Inflationary Spiral

By Michael Ballanger – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Before I launch into one of my classic, bitter, vitriolic diatribes against all forms of modern-day interventionalist-type, fraudulent excuses for what use to be “free markets,” have a gander at the chart below. Pay particular attention to the smiles on all of those beaming faces. . .

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When the Protests Die Down, Iran’s Economic Problems Will Live On

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Some of the grievances behind the recent wave of protests in Iran, such as disappointment with the nuclear deal and low oil prices, will remain beyond the government’s power to change.
  • Unstable food prices, decreasing purchasing power and high rates of unemployment and underemployment will continue to pose problems for everyday citizens across the country.
  • The sensitive reform measures necessary to overhaul subsidy systems, labor laws and business contracts, which are as much political as they are economic, will probably set off more unrest in the future. 

Students at the University of Tehran run for cover as tear gas is lobbed at demonstrators on Dec. 30, 2017.(STR/AFP/Getty Images)

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The Truth About Trade

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The one subject, which became a headline issue last year, and even divides experts is trade. It will become increasingly important in 2018 as the US develops her trade policy, particularly with respect to China, and as the UK negotiates her Brexit terms with the EU.

Ignorance dominates this subject. Surely, people say, industry should be protected from unfair trade practices, such as goods manufactured in foreign sweat-shops, or unfair dumping of commodities, such as steel. If President Trump can protect American business from unfair competition, it would be good for the American economy. Then there’s the business of currency rates. Doesn’t a lower currency help restore the trade balance, by making exports cheap, and imports expensive? And surely, Britain leaving the EU risks trade tariffs being set up against British business. This means sterling must fall against the euro to rebalance trade.

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‘Nuclear Option’ to End Shutdown

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Feuding Democrats and Republicans in Congress are trying to dodge blame for a paralyzing standoff over immigration and showing few signs of progress on negotiations needed to end a government shutdown that stretched into a second day Sunday.

The finger-pointing played out in rare weekend proceedings in both the House and Senate, where lawmakers were eager to show voters they were actively working for a solution — or at least actively making their case why the other party was at fault. The scene highlighted the political stakes for both parties in an election-year shutdown whose consequences are far from clear.

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What Happens To Stocks When Bull Markets End

By Jeff Clark – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

You undoubtedly know that 2017 was a record-setting year for the broad stock markets. And while gold was up last year despite numerous headwinds, most mainstream investors aren’t paying much attention to gold since they keep seeing so much green in their stock portfolios.

Even I was taken back by some of the data from the bull market in stocks…

  • The Dow hit a record high 71 times last year. On average, a new high was hit more frequently than once a week.

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Apple must show what’s next after iPhone X

By Vitaliy Katsenelson – Re-Blogged From http://contrarianedge.com

The iPhone X is likely to be a phenomenal success for Apple. But its success will not be driven by anything new that the new phone packs inside. Instead, its success will be based on the phone’s screen size. Essentially, iPhone X provides the same screen real-estate as an iPhone Plus, but with the sleeker form factor of the iPhone 7 or 8.

Apple has done a great job at changing the paradigm of our thinking about the iPhone. If you only care about making phone calls, then an iPhone 4 is good enough. Why pay for more? You probably don’t even need to upgrade your phone for years, as long as the battery keeps holding its charge. However, for most, the actual “phone” function is the least important of the iPhone.

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Fed’s Policy Likely Will Mute Positive Effects of Tax Cuts

By Rob Willams – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

President Donald Trump’s tax cuts that went into effect this year will have a muted positive effect on the economy as the Federal Reserve raises interest rates and reduces its debt holdings, Hoisington Investment Management Co. said.

“The full spectrum of monetary policy is aligned against stronger growth in 2018,” chief investment officer Van Hoisington and economist Lacy Hunt said in a Jan. 11 report. “This monetary environment coupled with a heavily indebted economy, a low-saving consumer and well-known existing conditions of poor demographics suggest 2018 will bring economic disappointments.”

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Urban Farming

By Patrick Caughill – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Surplus and Scarcity

The planet is growing more food than ever, and yet millions of people continue to starve worldwide. People are hungry everywhere — in the country, in the suburbs. But increasingly, one of the front lines in the war against hunger is in cities. As urban populations grow, more people find themselves in food deserts, areas with “[l]imited access to supermarkets, supercenters, grocery stores, or other sources of healthy and affordable food,” according to a report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

New technologies are changing the equation, allowing people to grow food in places where it was previously difficult or impossible, and in quantities akin to traditional farms.

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Solar Cycles and the Equatorial Trough

[This lengthy, scholarly paper, though understated in style, may offer a major challenge to ‘consensus’ climate theory. -Bob]

By Michael Wallace, Hydrologist – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I have offered to write this guest essay to reflect recent talks I’ve presented to water resource professionals on hydroclimatology and Solar cycles. As an academic and hydrologic forecaster, I have followed an energy centric, reproducible data path to quantify correlations between solar cycles and atmospheric moisture patterns. I have anchored my study areas upon subdivisions of the hydrosphere, including the Equatorial Trough (ET) and its relative, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). I have exploited the lags to high correlations that I found to produce what appear to be some of the most accurate climate forecasts known.

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Artificially Intelligent Investors Rack Up Massive Returns in Stock Market Study

An international team of researchers showed that artificial intelligence can make a killing on the stock market — and some real-world hedge funds are already trying it.

Study: Climate Models Underestimate Cooling Effect of Daily Cloud Cycle

From PRINCETON UNIVERSITY – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Princeton University researchers have found that the climate models scientists use to project future conditions on our planet underestimate the cooling effect that clouds have on a daily — and even hourly — basis, particularly over land.

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97% Climate Consensus’ Starts to Crumble

A broad survey of climate change literature for 2017 reveals that the alleged “consensus” behind the dangers of anthropogenic global warming is not nearly as settled among climate scientists as people imagine.

Author Kenneth Richard found that during the course of the year 2017, at least 485 scientific papers were published that in some way questioned the supposed consensus regarding the perils of human CO2 emissions or the efficacy of climate models to predict the future.

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Paper & Gold Dollars

[A ‘Step Sum’ is a cumulative number of days up minus down. A BEV (Bear’s Eye View) shows the current price as a percent of the Most Recent High (eg. if MRH = 1000 and current price is 900, then the price is -10% (below) its MRH. -Bob]

By Mark Lundeen – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

It doesn’t look like it in the Dow Jones’ Bear’s Eye View (BEV) chart below, but in the past three weeks the venerable Dow has increased 1,100 points (4.39%). Three Fridays ago the Dow Jones closed with a 24K handle. Two weeks later it has almost blown through 25,000, closing the week at 25,803. When a market series makes ninety-four new all-time highs in only fourteen months, things like this happen.

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Science and Nonscience

By Neil Lock – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Today, I’m going to write about science. This won’t be a technical paper. It won’t be full of numbers or equations. Instead, I’m going to look at science from the generalist point of view. I’m going to ask questions like: What is science? How useful is it to the making of decisions, including political ones? And, how can we tell good science from bad?

What is science?

According to Webster’s, science is: “knowledge or a system of knowledge covering general truths or the operation of general laws.”

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SEA LEVEL: Getting a Rise Out of Nothing

By Kip Hansen (with help from Steve Case) – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

animation_350Prologue:  I have been writing recently about Sea Level Rise, both as particular local examples (  Guam,  Canton,  Miami,   New York, and  NY/NJ  )  and in the series SEA LEVEL: Rise and Fall, of which this is the fourth installment.

# # # # #

 

How does one get a rise out of nothing?

Let’s see just how R. Steven Nerem, of the CU Sea Level Research Group, manages to pull that trick out of a hat.  According to a report  at Nature.com:

 

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Corporate Earnings Repatriation

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

A loophole in the new U.S. tax law could allow multinational corporations like Apple Inc. to avoid paying billions of dollars in taxes on profits stashed overseas, according to experts.

Stemming from a Republican overhaul of international business taxes, the loophole involves the tax rates – 15.5 percent or 8 percent – that companies must pay on $2.6 trillion in profits they are holding abroad.

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Fed’s Misguided View on Inflation Drives Stock Bubble

By Rob Williams – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

David Rosenberg, the widely cited chief economist and strategist at Gluskin Sheff & Associates Inc., said the Federal Reserve may be fueling another speculative stock bubble with loose monetary policies.

The central bank, which is undergoing a significant leadership change, may err on the side of caution by keeping interest rates too low for too long, he said in a Jan. 11 report obtained by Newsmax Finance. That would continue to give investors greater incentive to seek bigger gains in riskier assets like stocks and junk bonds.

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Been There, Exceeded That

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Much angst has been expended on a very vague climate threshold, the so-called “2 degrees Celsius limit”, sometimes called the “2° global warming tipping point”.  I find it all quite hilarious, for a reason that will become clear shortly. First a bit of prologue. Here’s the New Republic from 2014 about the two-degree limit:

This Is What Our Hellish World Will Look Like After We Hit the Global Warming Tipping Point

BY REBECCA LEBER, December 21, 2014

The de facto assumption of climate change policy is that the world must limit the increase in global temperatures to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) above pre-Industrial levels, or risk hitting a tipping point where the impact becomes irreversible.

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Bubble Stock Investing

  By Bob Shapiro
I invest in Gold & Silver, mostly miners.
Most people, I expect, are unwilling or don’t have the temperament to put all their eggs in one basket. The most familiar of the highly liquid investments is stocks – shares of most of the companies you know and love plus many that you’ve never heard of.
But, by pretty much any objective measure, stocks are in Bubble territory today, and the FED has started a tightening cycle – and has promised major tightening leading up to the mid-term elections this November.
I suggest that you still can make money in stocks today, using a strategy that Hedge Funds originally were designed to use – buy stocks that you think have the brightest prospects and sell short stocks that likely will be dogs (by comparison). If your ‘good’ stocks indeed do better than your ‘bad’ stocks, then you’ll make money. It matters not whether they both go up, both go down, or the ‘good’ is up and the ‘bad’ down, so long as the ‘good’ does better than the ‘bad.’
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China Officials View Treasuries Less Attractive

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Officials reviewing China’s foreign-exchange holdings have recommended slowing or halting purchases of U.S. Treasuries, according to people familiar with the matter.

China holds the world’s largest foreign-exchange reserves, at $3.1 trillion, and regularly assesses its strategy for investing them. It isn’t clear whether the recommendations of the officials have been adopted.

Image: China Officials Are Said to View Treasuries Less Attractive

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Open Letter to President Donald Trump

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Subject: Has the UN’s Human-Induced Global Warming/Climate Change Movement Always Been Based on International “anti-growth, anti-capitalist, anti-American” Agendas?

Dear Mr. President:

I am writing you this open letter to ask you for your insights into the “anti-growth, anti-capitalist, anti-American” agendas behind the international catastrophic human-induced global warming/climate change movement, as discussed by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in her 2002 memoir Statecraft.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #298

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Frigid Weather: Since Christmas North America, east of the Rockies, has been very cold. In addition, the Atlantic Seaboard experienced an intense Nor’easter that brought rain, ice, and snow from Georgia to New England. Climate change alarmists are attempting to blame the cold on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. How CO2 may cause a cooling of the earth is not clearly established in physical theory. Government funded entities, such as NOAA, that rely on numerical models, did not predict the cold more than a few days in advance. Yet, a private entity, WeatherBELL Analytics, was warning of a cold year-end as early as October.

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Interest Rates Walking on Narrow Ledge

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From PentoPort

There is a huge shock in store for those who have been lulled to sleep by a stock market that has become accustomed to no volatility and only an upward direction. And that alarm bell can be found in the price action of Bitcoin, which recently tumbled over 40% is less than a week. For the implosion within the cryptocurrency world foreshadows what will happen with the major averages as the Federal Reserve futilely attempts to stop monetizing the exploding mountain of U.S. debt.

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Al Gore’s ‘Inconvenient Freeze’

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Josh has something to say, or rather, draw, about the recent kerfuffle over Al Gore and Michael Mann’s beliefs as covered here on WUWT and in the Washington Times:

Al Gore under fire for claiming icy storm is ‘exactly what we should expect from climate crisis’

Former vice president links freezing weather along eastern seaboard to global warming

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Despite What You’ve Heard, Global Warming Isn’t Making Weather More Extreme

By Investors Business Daily – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Climate Myths: We keep reading about how the extreme weather of 2017 is the “new normal” thanks to global warming — even if the weather in question is frigid air. But the data don’t show any trend in extreme weather events in the U.S. for decades. Science, anyone?

The latest to make this “new normal” claim is Munich RE, which issued its annual report on the damage costs from hurricanes, floods, wildfires and the like on Thursday

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