Emergency Medical Teams ORDERED To STAND DOWN While Kids Bled Out After Florida Shooting

By Mac Slavo – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

[Outside our usual fare, but safety affects everything. -Bob]

If you think like most, not much about the Parkland, Florida school shooting has added up so far. Now there are reports that the responding emergency medical teams sent in to save lives after the horrific shooting were told to “stand down” while some of the students bled out.

Natural News said it best:

It’s becoming increasingly obvious to every intelligent observer that someone wanted to maximize the body count from the shooting.

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Global Trade: Looking at the Big Picture

Mark Fleming-Williams   By Mark Fleming-Williams – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Global trade is in flux after the United States has made clear that it is no longer willing to take the lead.
  • While the United States wants to shake up international commerce, China wants to preserve the status quo, and Europe wants to continue on the post-war path.
  • The divergent interests of other countries and blocs, including China, Japan and the European Union, will make substantial alignment without the United States difficult.

(IStock Photos)

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Electricity Consumers File New Study in Their Call for EPA to Reopen its Endangerment Finding

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Key Points:

  1. Just Released, new research findings demonstrate that Ten Frequent Climate Alarmists’ Claims have each been Rebutted by true experts in each Field by simply citing the most relevant and credible empirical data.
  2. The new results invalidate 10 very frequent Alarmist Claims in recent years, and thereby also invalidate the so-called “lines of evidence” on which EPA claimed to base its 2009 CO2 Endangerment Finding.
  3. If the Endangerment Finding is not vacated, whether the current administration likes it or not, it is certain that electric utility, automotive and many other industries will face ongoing EPA CO2 regulation.
  4. This scientifically illiterate basis for regulation will raise U.S. energy prices thereby reducing economic growth, jobs and national security.

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Are These Bankers Better Than Wall Street?

By Paul Farrrugia – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

There are a group of bankers based in three cities, not Wall St., but Toronto, Vancouver, and Denver that you probably never heard of. Surprisingly they are gold stocks. They are royalty & streaming companies, otherwise known as the Three Kings (Franco-Nevada, Royal Gold, and Wheaton Precious Metals) are the non-media grabbing bankers in the mining sector. They collect their revenue from some of the biggest mining companies in the world: Glencore, Vale, Teck Resources, Barrick Gold, Newmont Mining, AngloGold Ashanti Limited. Yet, if you add up the staff of these 3 companies, it would be less than 100 people. At the same time, their combined revenue of almost $2 billion in 2016.  You could call them the bankers of mining.

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Gold Corridor From Dubai To China Sought By China

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Gold corridor from Dubai to China sought by Chinese Gold & Silver Exchange Society
– New Asian gold trading corridor could boost demand for 1 kg gold bars
– Should increase turnover for yuan-denominated gold coins and bars – President
– Secure supplies of physical gold from Middle East and Asia for China
– China positioning itself as leading gold trading and owning nation

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A New Paper About Hurricanes Shatters the Narrative

By Larry Kummer – From the Fabius Maximus website.

Summary: A new paper provides new information about hurricanes, one of the top natural disaster threats. It shatters the media’s narrative and illustrates how science works in the real world.

Real science in action!

Science shapes our world, revealing secrets of nature that allow humanity to build a better world — more secure and prosperous. Yet the public has little understanding of how it works.

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A Roman Lesson On Inflation

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

While it is the duty of the citizen to support the state, it is not the duty of the state to support the citizen” – President Grover Cleveland

The point President Cleveland made back in the 1880s was that individuals and vested interests had no rights to preferential treatment by a government elected to represent all. For if preference is given, it is always at the expense of others.

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New Heated Airport Runway Concept May Sharply Bias ‘Global Warming’ Signal in the Global Climate Monitoring Network

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Recent winter-weather related airport delays have become something that airport managers and airline executive want to solve. This story from NBC’s today show back in January 2018 highlights the issue and a potential solution:


Could heated airport runways melt away your winter travel headaches?

There have been thousands of flight delays and cancellations due to winter weather this year, and it’s only January. Not only that: snow and ice at airports can send planes skidding off slippery runways.

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Find The Sentence That Dooms Pension Funds

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

The “pension crisis” is one of those things – like flying cars and nuclear fusion – that’s always coming but never arrives. But for pension funds reason it hasn’t yet happened is also the reason that it will happen, and soon:

The Risk Pension Funds Can’t Escape

(Wall Street Journal) – Public pension funds that lost hundreds of billions during the last financial crisis still face significant risk from one basic investment: stocks.

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Trump’s Labor Secretary Keeps Obama’s Pro-Illegals Policies

By Joshua Paladino – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

President Barack Obama appointed Tom Perez as U.S. Secretary of Labor in 2013.

He implemented policies to support and defend illegal immigrants against U.S. laws.

President Donald Trump’s Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta was appointed to correct the pro-illegal immigrant policies of his predecessor.

Powerline, a conservative blog, on Monday described how Acosta has refused to make any substantive changes at the Department of Labor.

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Bigger Deficits = Higher Interest Rates =…Many Bad Things

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Mainstream economics uses a fairly simple equation when it comes to public policy: More government spending equals more growth, which is just about always a good thing.

The problem is with the “just about always” part. At the bottom of recessions, tax cuts and higher government spending can indeed stop the shrinkage and get things going again. And fiscal stimulus might be relatively harmless when an economy has minimal debt and can therefore handle a bit of deficit spending without negative side effects.

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Gold’s Curious Sentiment

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Gold is faring quite well today technically, though you sure wouldn’t know it from the rampant bearish sentiment. Gold’s price is in a strong uptrend over a year old, high in both its current upleg and young bull market. Gold isn’t far from breaking out to its best levels since September 2013, a really big deal. The stock markets even finally sold off after years of unnatural calm. Yet traders are still down on gold.

Across all markets price action drives psychology. When something’s price is rising, traders get excited and bullish on it. So they increasingly buy to ride that upside momentum, amplifying it. Of course the opposite is true when a price is falling, which breeds bearishness and capital flight. Given gold’s great technical picture today, investors and speculators alike should be growing enthusiastic about its upside potential.

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5 Big Drivers of Higher Inflation Rates Ahead

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Investors got lulled into a state of inflation complacency. Persistently low official inflation rates in recent years depressed bond yields along with risk premiums on all financial assets.

That’s changing in 2018. Five drivers of higher inflation rates are now starting to kick in.

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Comparing Homicide Rates to Gun Ownership

Bu Onan Coca – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

If you keep an eye on the media these days, you may notice that whenever they talk about guns, they talk about “gun homicide” as well. As if these two figures are inextricably linked and tell the whole story of the gun debate.

It’s simply not so.

An interesting graph that appeared on Facebook reminded me of the lies the anti-gunners tell using cherry-picked crime stats.

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Climate Alarmism is Bizarre, Dogmatic, & Intolerant

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Claims defy parody, as alarmists become more tyrannical and their policies wreak havoc

Climate alarmism dominated the Obama era and run-up to Paris. But it’s at least as bizarre, dogmatic and intolerant now that: President Trump pulled the United States out of the all pain/no gain Paris climate pact; the US EPA is reversing anti-fossil fuel programs rooted in doom-and-gloom climatology; America is producing and exporting more oil, gas and coal; developing nations are burning vastly more of these fuels; Poland is openly challenging EU climate diktats; and German, British Australian and other politicians are voicing increasing concerns about job-killing, eco-unfriendly “green” energy.

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When Will The Next Credit Crisis Occur?

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The timing of any credit crisis is set by the rate at which the credit cycle progresses. People don’t think in terms of the credit cycle, wrongly believing it is a business cycle. The distinction is important, because a business cycle by its name suggests it emanates from business. In other words, the cycle of growth and recessions is due to instability in the private sector and this is generally believed by state planners and central bankers.

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World’s First Floating Wind Farm Outperforms

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

The 30MW Hywind Scotland, the world’s first commercial-scale floating wind farm, performed better than expected in its first three full months in production, Statoil, the operator of the wind farm said.

The Hywind Scotland floating wind farm. (Photo: Øyvind Gravås / Woldcam – Statoil ASA)

US-China Trade War Escalates

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Trade war between two superpowers continues to escalate

– White House likely to impose steep tariffs on aluminium and steel imports on ‘national security grounds’

– US may impose global tariff of at least 24% on imports of steel and 7.7% on aluminium

– China “will certainly take necessary measures to protect our legitimate rights.”

– China is USA’s largest trading partner, fastest-growing market for U.S. exports, 3rd largest market for U.S. exports in the world.

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Origin of Fracking Dates Back to the Civil War

By John Manfreda – Re-Blogged From Business Insider

Over the past decade, the biggest story in the US energy sector has been hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking.

This drilling technique has enabled oil and gas producers to extract oil and natural gas from shale rock, thus increasing oil and gas production inside the US.

Media pundits have claimed that this form of oil and gas extraction is a technological breakthrough, which has enabled the US to become the world’s largest oil and gas producer, and will enable the US to become energy independent by the year 2020.

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The End Of The Silver Manipulation

By Chris Marcus – Re-Blogged From Miles-Franklin

During a recent interview, First Majestic Silver CEO Keith Neumeyer shared some interesting comments about the silver market. In particular he spoke about a development that could lead to the end of the ongoing manipulation.

For those not familiar, Neumeyer is one of, if not the only mining CEO to speak publicly about the manipulation that has left silver prices suppressed. His interviews always offer insightful commentary, and this latest one covered what could be a game changing event for the price of silver.

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It’s Weather, Not Climate Change, Governor Brown

By Robert W. Endlich – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Weather, not human-caused CO2-fueled global warming, is responsible for California wildfires

2017 featured incredibly intense, damaging wildfires in California: first the Wine Country fires of October, and later the massive Thomas Fire in December. Each destroyed hundreds of homes, the latter in many of the affluent suburbs and enclaves northwest of Los Angeles and Hollywood.

The Thomas Fire is the largest in modern California history, with over 1000 structures destroyed. The fires and subsequent mudslides killed over 60 people and left many others severely burned or injured.

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Exxon Sues the Suers in Fierce Climate-Change Case

By Bob Van Voris – Re-Blogged From Bloomberg Businessweek

  • A ‘conspiracy’ was hatched in La Jolla, Calif., company says
  • Exxon says the suits are violating its free speech rights

As climate-change lawsuits against the oil industry mount, Exxon Mobil Corp. is taking a bare-knuckle approach rarely seen in legal disputes: It’s going after the lawyers who are suing it.

 The company has targeted at least 30 people and organizations, including the attorneys general of New York and Massachusetts, hitting them with suits, threats of suits or demands for sworn depositions. The company claims the lawyers, public officials and environmental activists are “conspiring” against it in a coordinated legal and public relations campaign.

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Watching Thunderstorms Chase The Hot Spots

By Willis Eschenbach- Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Once on a lovely hot August day in eastern Oregon, my gorgeous ex-fiancee and I sat entranced and watched a parade of dust devils. I’ve written about dust devils before, they’re one of my favorite emergent phenomena.

Like many such emergent climate phenomena, dust devils are driven by a temperature difference between the surface and the surrounding atmosphere. Once that temperature difference (called “delta-T”) is exceeded, dust devils form spontaneously.

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Semi Bearish?

By Gary Tanashian – Re-Blogged From http://www.NFTRH.com

Over the last several years, beginning in 2013 I’ve made post titles like ‘Semi Bullish‘ in response to the bullish leading edge economic cycle indicator, the Semiconductor Equipment sector and its implications for broad stocks and the economy. Those implications of economic acceleration were along these lines… Semi Equipment Book-to-Bill (b2b) → Broad Semi → Manufacturing → Employment → Firm Economy. Shortly after the b2b was noted as bullish the SOX index and the S&P 500 broke out to new highs, not to even hint at looking back until the rocky 2015-2016 period.

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Medieval Warming Period Was Global, Not Regional

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the “we have to get rid of the Medieval Warming Period” department. Even though this paper was published in late 2017, it was recently highlighted in EoS, as shown below. Michael Mann, and others, in their zeal to cover up warming periods of the past, to make it look like his hockey stick is “unprecedented”, won’t like this paper. They also won’t like this map showing over 1000 studies and their results:

Climate reconstructions of the ‘Medieval Warm Period’ 1000-1200 AD. Legend: MWP was warm (red), cold (blue), dry (yellow), wet


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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #304

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Sea Level Hockey Stick? Judith Curry continues her excellent analysis of sea level rise and the need to assure against false conclusions. Unfortunately, too many “experts” have drawn conclusions from preliminary data even before errors in measurement and calculations were fully resolved. As with early calculations of temperatures from satellite data, early errors in the measurement and calculations lead to skepticism for the entire method of measurements. For science to advance, one must recognize that errors, though not desirable, must be expected, then corrected. For satellite temperature data, minor changes in orbits were not originally recognized, but when recognized, calculations were changed accordingly.

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Are Intragovernmental Holdings Real Debt?

By Scott Anderson – Re-Blogged From Seeking Alpha

[This article orignally was written over 5 years ago. I’ve update the numbers to today. -Bob]

As everyone who is paying attention knows, the amount of US debt outstanding is fast approaching $20.5Trillion. But whom do we owe it to? Most of the debt, about $14.8T of it, represents debt held by the public. This portion of the debt is easy to comprehend. It could be bonds held by investors, savings bonds given to children, bonds purchased by the Chinese government, or even bonds purchased by our good buddies at the Federal Reserve. The remaining balance of $5.7T, known as “Intragovernmental Holdings,” is what I would like to discuss today.

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GM Plant Shutdown Shocks South Korea

By Thomson Reuters – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Only weeks into a new job heading General Motors Co’s international operations, Barry Engle flew into a frigid South Korea in January and held a series of meetings with government officials to discuss the future of GM’s loss-making local unit.

In what they thought were meet-and-greet introductions, senior officials agreed to work with the global automaker on problems at GM Korea, according to South Korean officials with direct knowledge of the meetings.

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Gorsuch Deciding Vote in Labor Union Case

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

America’s union leaders are about to find out if they were right to fiercely oppose Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court as a pivotal, potentially devastating vote against organized labor.

The newest justice holds the deciding vote in a case to be argued Feb. 26 that could affect the financial viability of unions that are major supporters of Democratic candidates and causes. The unions represent more than 5 million government workers in 24 states and the District of Columbia who could be affected by the outcome. The other eight justices split 4 to 4 when the issue was last at the court in 2016.

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The Shape of U.S. Restrictions on Chinese FDI

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • In hopes of forcing China to open further, the United States is considering investment restrictions that would mirror those imposed by China.
  • China’s investment goals are to cement its position in the stable, developed U.S. economy and fuel growth in sectors key to its economic transition.
  • As such, China has two concerns: Sectors where its own restrictions will mean harsh U.S. measures and those sectors of high priority to Beijing.

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Global Debt Crisis II Cometh

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Global debt ‘area of weakness’ and could ‘induce financial panic’ – King warns

– Global debt to GDP now 40 per cent higher than it was a decade ago – BIS warn – Global non-financial corporate debt grew by 15% to 96% of GDP in the past six years – US mortgage rates hit highest level since May 2014

– US student loans near $1.4 trillion, 40% expected to default in next 5 years

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Turkey’s President Takes a Victory Lap

Sinan Ciddi   By Sinan Ciddi – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Following a referendum vote on sweeping constitutional changes in April 2017, Turkey’s government will transition from a parliamentary democracy to an executive presidency after the next presidential election in 2019.
  • The odds of a free and fair election are slim given the measures incumbent President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has taken — and the further measures he will take — to ensure he comes out on top.
  • Though former President Abdullah Gul would be Erdogan’s most credible challenger, he is unlikely to run in the next presidential race.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has since become his country's first popularly elected president, commemorates 50 years of Turkish immigration to Germany at a celebration in Berlin in 2011.

(SEAN GALLUP/Getty Images)

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Fla. Sheriff Says Gun Control Is Already on Campuses and Calls Arming Teachers a ‘Game-Changer’

By Jenni Fink – Re-Blogged From IJR

The Parkland, Florida, school shooting yielded calls for more gun control, but Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd instead called for arming teachers.

Judd told Fox News that gun control on every campus in Florida dictates that no one can bring a gun onto campus. He added that the only person who violates this rule is the “crazed person — the active shooter.”

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White House Seeks 72 Percent Cut to Clean Energy Research

From the Washington Post

The Trump administration is poised to ask Congress for deep budget cuts to the Energy Department’s renewable energy and energy efficiency programs, slashing them by 72 percent overall in fiscal 2019, according to draft budget documents obtained by The Washington Post.

Many of the sharp cuts would probably be restored by Congress, but President Trump’s budget, due out in February, will mark a starting point for negotiations and offer a statement of intent and policy priorities.

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Study: Thanks to Fracking, We Don’t Need Obama’s Clean Power Plan (CPP) to Meet Paris Climate Target

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the “thanks to fracking, the biggest driver of lower carbon dioxide emissions has been declining natural gas prices” department.

Even without the clean power plan, US can achieve Paris Agreement emissions reductions

CMU researchers point out that there are many paths to compliance

Carnegie Mellon University researchers have calculated that the U.S. can meet–or even beat–the near-term carbon dioxide emission reductions required by the United Nations Paris Agreement, despite the Trump Administration’s withdrawal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP).

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Wondering Which States Americans Hate to Live In? Ask U-Haul

By Leon Lunsky – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

Americans are dynamic people.  World statistics on the number of cars per capita show that America is in first place among the “big” countries and in third place among all countries, behind the dwarfs of San Marino and Monaco.

Where do Americans drive other than to work, shopping, and perhaps to school?  Americans move, and move quite often.  They relocate to neighboring cities and distant states.  By and large, the U.S. looks like a big monolithic country.  In fact, the U.S. is a federal republic of independent states, each with many laws, many customs, and a unique political climate.

Does the changing political climate affect population migration between states?  Of course, it does, but how?  What if we were to express the movement of intra-American migration, not in words, but in the language of numbers?  A convenient measure of internal migration could be the U-Haul Index. Continue reading

Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #303

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week.“Akin to, and largely responsible for the sweeping changes in our industrial-military posture, has been the technological revolution during recent decades.

“In this revolution, research has become central, it also becomes more formalized, complex, and costly. A steadily increasing share is conducted for, by, or at the direction of, the Federal government.

“Today, the solitary inventor, tinkering in his shop, has been overshadowed by task forces of scientists in laboratories and testing fields. In the same fashion, the free university, historically the fountainhead of free ideas and scientific discovery, has experienced a revolution in the conduct of research. Partly because of the huge costs involved, a government contract becomes virtually a substitute for intellectual curiosity. For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers.

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Hezbollah in South America: The Threat to Businesses

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Analysis Highlights

South America is a strong base of operations for the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah, which has had a presence in the continent dating back to the 1980s. The group established finance and logistical networks, which it used to facilitate two bombings in Argentina in the 1990s. The first bombing in 1992 targeted the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, killing 29 people and injuring 242 more. A second bombing in 1994 targeted the Asociacion Mutual Israelita Argentina (AMIA), a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, killing 85 and injured over 300. Since then, Hezbollah has shifted its operational focus from terror attacks to criminal activity to raise money, entering South America’s lucrative drug-trafficking business and dealing primarily with cocaine and heroin. Previously, we explored what Hezbollah now does in South America, and where it does it. Here, we will explore the threat Hezbollah poses to businesses in South America.

(Stratfor)

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Forecast for Solar Cycle 25

By James A. Marusek – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I. Introduction

The sun is the natural source of heat and light for our planet. Without our sun, the earth would be a cold dead planet adrift in space. But the sun is not constant. It changes and these subtle changes affect the Earth’s climate and weather.

At the end of solar cycle 23, sunspot activity declined to a level not seen since the year 1913. [Comparing Yearly Mean Total Sunspot Numbers1]

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Price of Bullets Slowly Rises as Firearms Industry Struggles

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

For the last few weeks, shooting enthusiasts may have been paying more for bullets without realizing it. Vista Outdoor Inc., which owns a variety of firearms and ammunition companies, recently announced that it had increased the price of ammunition last month.

In an earnings call held last week, Chief Executive Officer Chris Metz told investors that the company first increased the price of ammunition in early January. A second price increase will come in April, he added.

 Both boosts in price were “in the low- to mid-single digits.” Vista owns Federal Premium Ammunition, CCI, Estate Cartridge, and Force on Force, among other shooting-sports and outdoor product companies. Commodity pressure led to the increase, Metz said.

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Trump Will Be ‘Fall Guy’ for Fed’s Mistakes

By Rob Williams – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Peter Schiff, the chief executive of Euro Pacific Capital and financial commentator, said President Trump will end up getting blamed for market and economic turmoil caused by the Federal Reserve’s misguided policies.

That means Trump will lose the White House in 2020, and be replaced by a left-wing candidate who will expand the government’s role in the economy, Schiff said.

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World Embraces Debt At Exactly The Wrong Time

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

Self-destruction usually happens in stages. At first there’s a binge in which the thrill outweighs the sense of transgression. This is usually followed by remorse, acknowledgement of risks, and an attempt to reform.

But straight-and-narrow is exhausting, and because of this is frequently just temporary, eventually giving way to a kind of capitulation in which the addict drops even the pretense of self-control.

2018 is apparently the year in which the world enters this final stage of its addiction to debt. Wherever you look, leverage is soaring as governments, corporations and individuals just give up and embrace the idea that borrowing is no longer a necessary evil, but simply necessary. Some recent examples:

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Arm Every Teacher

By Adrian Vance – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

[I taught in middle & high schools for several years, and I agree with this author’s suggestion, especially when I note that the Las Vegas & Florida (and other) shootings were tied to terrorism. -Bob]

As one with eight years teaching Chemistry in high schools, with 1200 student years in schools ranging from a small town in Illinois to two in Los Angeles City Schools, and bearing a California Life Diploma Certification, which qualifies me to teach in any classroom in the state for the term of my life, I feel entitled to speak with authority on this matter.

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Cold Weather Kills 20 Times as M any People as Hot Weather

By Joseph D’Aleo and Allan MacRae – Re-Blogged From http://blog.friendsofscience.org/
Cold weather kills. Throughout history and in modern times, many more people succumb to cold exposure than to hot weather, a s evidenced in a wide range of cold and warm climates.
Evidence is provided from a study of 74 million deaths in thirteen cold and warm countries including Thailand and Brazil, and studies of the United Kingdom, Europe, the USA, Australia and Canada.
Contrary to popular belief, Earth is colder-than-optimum for human survival. A warmer world, such as was experienced during the Roman Warm Period and the Medieval  Warm Period, is expected to lower winter deaths and a colder world like the Little Ice Age will increase winter mortality, absent adaptive measures.
These conclusions have been known for many decades, based on national mortality statistics.
WORLD
Cold weather kills 20 times as many people as hot weather, according to an international study analyzing over 74 million deaths in 384 locations across 13 countries, published in The Lancet. http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(14)62114-0/abstract
The Lancet study summary states:
[excerpts]
“We collected data for 384 locations in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, UK, and USA.
We analysed 74 225 200 deaths in various periods between 1985 and 2012. In total, 7.71% (95% empirical CI 7.43 –7.91) of mortality was attributable to non-optimum temperature in the selected countries within the study period, with substantial differences between countries, ranging from 3.37% (3.06 to 3.63) in Thailand to 11.00% (9.29 to 12.47) in China. The temperature percentile of minimum mortality varied from roughly the 60th percentile in tropical areas to about the 80–90th percentile in temperate regions.
More temperature -attributable deaths were caused by cold (7.29%, 7.02–7.49) than by heat (0.42%, 0.39–0.44). Extreme cold and hot temperatures were responsible for 0.86% (0.84–0.87) of total mortality.
Most of the temperature -related mortality burden was attributable to the contribution of cold. The effect of days of extreme temperature was substantially less than that attributable to milder but non-optimum weather.
This evidence has important implications for the planning of public-health interventions to minimize the health consequences of adverse temperatures, and for predictions of future effect in climate-change scenarios.”
UNITED KINGDOM AND EUROPE
The Guardian examined Excess Winter Mortality after the 2012/13 hard winter. A total of about 50,000 Excess Winter Deaths occurred that winter in the UK.
[excerpt]:
“Each year since 1950, the UK Office for National Statistics has looked at excess winter mortality…Excess winter mortality was 31,100 in England and Wales in 2012/13 – up 29% from the previous year. Figures for Scotland were also released recently showing a much smaller increase in winter deaths, up 4.1% to 19,908. In Northern Ireland meanwhile, the raw numbers were low but the increase was large – a rise of 12.7% to 559 deaths.
The methodology behind the maths is surprisingly simple; the ONS take an average of deaths in winter (those in December to March) and subtract the average of non-winter deaths (April to July of the current year and August to November of the previous year). The result is considered ‘excess’.“
 
In the milder climates of western and southern Europe, the Excess Winter Mortality is greater than in the colder northern climates, where people are more accustomed to colder winters and homes are better-designed to keep residents warm. http://jech.bmj.com/content/57/10/784.full – See Table 2.
Also energy costs in Europe are much higher due to their early adoption of inefficient and costly green energy schemes, forcing the poor to make difficult choices – in the UK
this is called “Heat or Eat”.
UNITED STATES
Similarly, the USA death rate in January and February is more than 1000 deaths per day greater than in July and August.
[excerpt]:
“Data from the US National Center for Health Statistics for 2001-2008 shows that on average 7,200 Americans died each day during the months of December, January, February and March, compared to the average 6,400 who died daily during the rest of the year. In 2008, there were 108,500 ‘excess’ deaths during the 122 days in the cold months (December to March).“
MORE RECORD LOWS THAN HIGHS IN USA
Despite claims that extreme heat is increasing and cold is decreasing, the un-adjusted statewide extreme temperature data shows the opposite. A total of 23 of the state all
-time record high temperatures occurred in the 1930s and 38 record highs occurred before 1960. There have been more record lows since the 1940s than record highs.
In the USA, the 1930’s was the warmest decade.
Source: Dr. John Christy, Senate and House Testimony
AUSTRALIA
Even in warmer climates such as Australia, Thailand and Brazil a similar pattern exists. Australians are up to 30% more likely to die during winters than summers, as determined in a study by the Queensland University of Technology (QUT). http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/01/150112110820.htm
[excerpt]
“Across the country severe winters that are colder and drier than normal are a far bigger risk to health than sweltering summers that are hotter than average.
QUT Associate Professor Adrian Barnett, a statistician with the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation and the lead researcher of the study, said death rates in Australian cities were up to 30 per cent higher in winter than summer.
The researchers analyzed temperature, humidity and mortality data from 1988 to 2009 for Adelaide Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney.”
CANADA
Statistics Canada also reports deaths by month. The graph below shows that the Canadian death rate in January was more than 100 deaths/day greater than in August
for the years 2001 to 2006. In 2006, there were 5,640 excess deaths during the winter months in Canada. http://wattsupwiththat.com/2010/01/06/winter-kills-excess-deaths
Canada has lower Excess Winter Mortality Rates than the USA and much lower than the UK. This is attributed to our better adaptation to cold weather, including better home insulation and home heating systems, and much lower energy costs than the UK, as a result of low-cost natural gas due to shale fracking and our lower implementation of inefficient and costly green energy schemes. The problem with green energy schemes is they are not green and they produce little useful energy, primarily because they are too intermittent and require almost 100% fossil-fueled (or other) backup.
The Alberta Climate Change initiative seeks to reduce the use of fossil fuels and increase the use of green energy. In Europe, where green energy schemes have been widely implemented, the result is higher energy costs that are unaffordable for the elderly and the poor, and increased winter deaths. Europe an politicians are retreating from highly
-subsidized green energy schemes and returning to fossil fuels. When misinformed politicians fool with energy systems, innocent people suffer and die.

Paleoclimate Study From China Suggests Warmer Temperatures in the Past

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

People send me stuff. Today in my inbox, WUWT regular Michael Palmer sends this note:

My wife Shenhui Lang found and translated an interesting article from 1973 that attempts the reconstruction of a climate record for China through several millennia (see attached).  The author is long dead (he died in 1974), and “China Daily” is now the name of an English language newspaper established only in 1981. I think it would be very difficult to even locate anyone holding the rights to the original, and very unlikely for anyone to take [copyright] issue with the publication of the English translation.

The paper is interesting in that it shows a correlation between height of the Norwegian snow line and temperature in China for the last 5000 years.


US Public Debt Surges By $175 Billion In One Day

By SRSrocco – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

After the U.S. Government passed the new budget and debt increase, with the President’s signature and blessing, happy days are here again.  Or are they?  As long as the U.S. Government can add debt, then the Global Financial and Economic Ponzi Scheme can continue a bit longer.  However, the days of adding one Dollar of debt to increase the GDP by two-three Dollars are gone forever.  Now, we are adding three-four Dollars of debt to create an additional Dollar in GDP.  This monetary hocus-pocus isn’t sustainable.

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Venezuela’s Annual Inflation Rate Has Reached Over 4,000 Percent

By Sydney Jones – Re-Blogged From https://ijr.com

In 2017, Venezuela’s annual inflation rate rose to 4,068 percent, according to reports made by the opposition-led National Assembly.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the inflation rate has risen so rapidly that the government cannot print money fast enough to keep up with the demand. A U.S. dollar currently is worth more than 200,000 bolivars, the Venezuelan currency.

TOPSHOT-VENEZUELA-CRISIS-ECONOMY-PETRO

Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

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2017 Trade Deficit Worst since 2008

By Wolf Richter – Re-Blogged From Wolf Street

Trade deficit in non-petroleum products hit a record of $734 billion.

2017 was a banner year for the US trade deficit, according to the Commerce Department’s report today. Corporate America’s supply chains weave all over the world in search of lower costs. Other countries have an “industrial policy” designed to produce trade surpluses for them. This combo ballooned the US trade deficit in goods and services to $566 billion, up by $61 billion, or 12%, from 2016. It was the worst trade deficit since 2008.

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