Making Concrete From Coal Ash

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From WUWT

WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete

New coal concrete reduces energy demand, greenhouse emissions

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation.

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An Orange a Day Keeps Blindness Away

By Bill Hoffmann – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Eating just one orange a day may help stop macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness, according to a new study.

Researchers who interviewed more than 2,000 adults age 50 and above, and followed them over a 15-year period, found those who regularly eat oranges are less likely to develop the age-related, vision-robbing disease.

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Breath Test to Detect Cancer in Trials at Hospitals

By Clyde Hughes – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A breath test that could detect cancer is in trials now in numerous hospitals after a test run in one health center since 2015, The Sun reported.

The ReCIVA Breath Sampler reportedly can analyze a gasp of breath for the slightest trace of cancer-linked chemicals. Cambridge scientists Billy Boyle, who lost his wife to colon cancer at 36 in 2014, created the test, The Sun wrote.

Image: Breath Test to Detect Cancer in Trials at Hospitals

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Tariffs “Trump” Tax Cuts

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From Pento Portfolio Strategies

China appears to have more to lose from a trade war with the US simply because the math behind surpluses and deficits renders the Bubble Blowers in Beijing at a big disadvantage. When you get right down to the nuclear option in a trade war, Trump could impose tariffs on all of the $505 billion worth of Chinese exported goods, while Premier Xi can only impose a duty on $129 billion worth of US exported goods–judging by the announcement on July 10thh of additional tariffs on $200 billion more of China’s exports to the US we are well underway towards that end. However, this doesn’t mean China completely runs out of ammunition to fight the battle once it hits that limit.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #321

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org The Science and Environmental Policy Project

By Ken Haapala, President

Sea Level Hockey-Sticks? Last week’s TWTW discussed the lawsuit by Rhode Island against oil companies, and the claims that dire increases in sea level rise will occur this century. These claims are like those made by Oakland, San Francisco, and New York City. To establish any observational basis for these claims, this week’s TWTW will further explore their sources.

The technical report, “The State of Narraganset Bay and Its Watershed. 2017,” is instructive. Figure 1 (p. 75) and Figure 2 (p. 76) show the decades-long sea level trends in Newport and Providence, RI, of 2.78 +/- 0.16 mm per year (1.1 inches per decade) and 2.25 +/- 0.25 mm per year (0.9 inches per decade), respectively, from the established NOAA publication “Tides and Currents.” Then, Figure 3 (p. 78) shows NOAA projections of a rise of up to 11 feet by the end of the century (extreme case)! How did a rise of 10 inches per century, with an error of about 10%, turn in to rise of 11 feet by the end of the century (280 mm per century to 3352 mm per century)? This increase in rate of rise of more than 10 times that being measured.

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U.S. Tornadoes on the Decline Since 1970

By Paul Homewood – Re-Blogged From WUWT

We’ve been told time and again by climate alarmists that global warming would make more severe weather. In fact, the opposite is true according to recently released tornado data from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center.

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/torngraph-big.png

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/torngraph-big.png

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Claim: Climate Change will Cause a Global Corn Crop Failure

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Another global warming food security study based on unrealistic assumptions.

The global corn crop is vulnerable to the effects of climate change

By ADAM WERNICK

Corn, also known as maize, is the world’s most-produced food crop. But it could be headed for trouble as the Earth warms.

A new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America finds that climate change will not only increase the risk of food shocks from world corn production but that these crop failures could occur simultaneously.

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