Palladium Just Zoomed Past Gold

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Palladium might not fill headlines the way gold does, but it’s been on fire lately. Not only has the precious metal been the best performing commodity for two years straight, but its price also just shot past gold for the first time since 2001. For the first time ever, it broke through $1,400 an ounce last week before pulling back somewhat. From its 52-week low set in August, palladium has climbed almost 70 percent. It’s added about 16 percent in the past 30 trading days alone.

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Climate Related Death Risk Down 99% Since 1920

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Bjørn Lomborg writes on Facebook about some new and surprising data that turn climate alarmist claims upside down.

Fewer and fewer people die from climate-related natural disasters.

This is clearly opposite of what you normally hear, but that is because we’re often just being told of one disaster after another – telling us how *many* events are happening. The number of reported events is increasing, but that is mainly due to better reporting, lower thresholds and better accessibility (the CNN effect). For instance, for Denmark, the database only shows events starting from 1976.

Instead, look at the number of dead per year, which is much harder to fudge. Given that these numbers fluctuate enormously from year to year (especially in the past, with huge droughts and floods in China), they are here presented as averages of each decade (1920-29, 1930-39 etc, with last decade as 2010-18). The data is from the most respected global database, the International Disaster Database. There is some uncertainty about complete reporting from early decades, which is why this graph starts in 1920, and if anything this uncertainty means the graph *underestimates* the reduction in deaths.

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When Environmentalism Becomes Corruption

By Craig Liukko – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Part 1

Environmental principles are too often used to stop lawful, responsible, vital land uses.

All across the United States, private property rights are under assault – assault by state and federal legislators and regulators, environmentalist groups, wealthy liberal foundations, corporations and other special interests, often acting in coordination or collusion with one another. They are seizing or taking control of lands and other valuable property without due process or just compensation, under a host of environmental and other justifications, many of which are fictional at best.

I have personally witnessed attempts to shut down the small mining industry in my state of Colorado. Exploration and development by this industry often results in discoveries of major deposits of minerals that are essential for everything we make, use and do – including medical equipment, cell phones, computers, aircraft, aerospace, automobiles, wind turbines, solar panels, batteries, and modern high-tech weapon and communication systems.

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Does The Climate-Science Industry Purposely Ignore A Simple Aspect of Strong El Niño Events That Causes Long-Term Global Warming?

By Bob Tisdale – Re-Blogged From WUWT

It was a little more than 10 years ago that I published my first blog posts on the obvious upward steps in the sea surface temperatures of a large portion of the global oceans…upward steps that are caused by El Niño events…upward steps that lead to sunlight-fueled, naturally occurring global warming.

There is a very simple explanation for those El Niño-caused upward shifts that also make themselves known in the sea surface temperature data for much larger portion of the global oceans than I first presented a decade ago…the upward steps that are blatantly obvious in the satellite-era (starts November 1981) of sea surface temperature data for the South Atlantic, Indian and West Pacific Oceans, as shown in Figure 1, which together cover about 52% of the surfaces of the global oceans.

Figure 1

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Paris Agreement Fan Laments Massive Fossil Fuel Powered Industrialisation in Bangladesh

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Greens attacking Bangladeshis for trying to build a better future for their children.

From Paris to Bangladesh, how the climate change accord is imploding

By Divya Rajagopal

The onslaught of a new power plant on the fragile ecology of the Sunderbans is fresh proof of the futility of climate reforms. A ground report from ET.

Until two years ago, 28-year-old Sajjad Hossain Tuhin, a student of forestry, would walk up to the banks of the River Rupsa in Khulna, Bangladesh, to capture the moment of dusk, when the setting sun left the sky lit up like fireworks. In romantic Bengali literature, it is described as the moment to catch a glimpse of a new bride. But Tuhin doesn’t do this anymore. The sun now sets behind the boundary of an upcoming LNG power plant. The banks of the Rupsa are astir with vehicles ferrying rocks and cement to speed up the completion of the plant that will fire up Bangladesh’s economic growth.

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7 Business Security Myths You Shouldn’t Believe Anymore

By Ahmad Hamidi – Re-Blogged From Secure Technologies

[My preferred security company in southern New Hampshire is Saetel Systems. Ray has been installing home security & home entertainment systems for 30 years. -Bob]

Here are 7 of the biggest business security misconceptions, and how you can avoid falling for them.
No matter what your business size is, you need a robust security plan to protect your employees, customers, and infrastructure. Sadly, many businesses have misconceptions about what business security is and how it should be implemented. This is why many fall prey to the common security myths listed below…

7 Business Security Myths You Shouldn’t Believe Anymore

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The Dollar Works Just Fine

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Last week, we joked that we don’t challenge beliefs. Here’s one that we want to challenge today: the dollar doesn’t work as a currency, because it’s losing value. Even the dollar’s proponents, admit it loses value. The Fed itself states that its mandate is price stability—which it admits means relentless two percent annual debasement (Orwell would be proud). So there is no question that the dollar loses value. The only mainstream debate is whether this is good or bad.

Our focus today is whether this is why the dollar doesn’t work, why it’s failing.

Prices have been rising for 100 years. There is no reason why they couldn’t go on rising for another 100. Or 1000. The inflation argument, as we call it, does not reach anyone other than those who already think the dollar is failing. The rest shrug it off. Most people really care only if their income goes up slower than prices go up.

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This Is New: Governments Ramp Up Borrowing IN ANTICIPATION Of A Slowdown

By John Rubino – Re-Blogged From Dollar Collapse

The business cycle has its stages, and they’re usually both predictable and logical. For example, governments tend to generate a lot of tax revenue late in an expansion as more people get jobs and start paying income taxes and rising stock prices generate big capital gains. Meanwhile, less has to be spent on social safety net programs because everyone is working. Combine higher tax revenues and lower spending and you get shrinking deficits.

But not this time. Government borrowing soared around the world in 2018, even as economic growth, employment and stock prices peaked. Why the change? Well, apparently governments have decided – for the first time since the inception of the business cycle – to preemptively attack the next recession.

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Israeli Scientists Predict Cure for Cancer Within a Year

By Solange Reyner – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Israeli scientists say they will likely have a cure for cancer within a year, according to The Jerusalem Post.

Dan Aridor, CEO of Accelerated Evolution Biotechnologies Ltd., said his team is developing an anti-cancer drug that will target several mutations in cancer cells using a combination of several-cancer directed peptides. The treatment is called MuTaTo, or multiobjective toxin.

“Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market,” Aridor said. “Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

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Disentangling California Drought

By Jim Steele – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Here is Jim Steele’s newest column article for the Tribune and 5 other Marin papers,~ctm

Pacifica Tribune column, January 16, 2019

What’s Natural?

Disentangling California Drought

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Devastating droughts are a great concern. Droughts disrupt ecosystems, agriculture, and drinking water supplies. Contrary to headlines suggesting we have only 12 years before descending into climate hell with more severe droughts, historically, Californians are not experiencing more severe droughts. Despite low stream flows and withering plants, there’s no agreement on how to best define drought. Different methods suggest different severities for the same drought. Thus, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s recent assessment, downgraded their ability to detect the causes of drought to “low confidence”.

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Don’t ban plastic bags!

By Hal Shurtlef – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Learn the facts about plastic versus paper bags – and bag the bans, instead

Like dozen towns and cities in Massachusetts and other states, Boston recently enacted a ban on plastic shopping bags. It went into effect December 14, 2018. It was a relatively easy vote, because “evil” plastic bags have received extensive bad press that generally ignores important facts.

The same holds true in other jurisdictions, especially those controlled by Democrats who a generation ago cared about American workers, but today too often subjugate the needs of blue collar families to demands by college educated and environmentalist elites, and even noisy grade school kids.

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French President Deploying Police Armed with High Capacity Live Ammunition Weapons to Intimidate Carbon Tax Protestors

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Green globalist President Macron has deployed non specialist police armed with semi-automatic weapons with large magazines to try to intimidate yellow vest carbon tax protestors.

French riot police are now using semi-automatic weapons with live ammunition against Yellow Vest protestors as Macron’s law and order crisis spirals

  • Officers were filmed brandishing weapons by Arc de Triomphe in Paris today
  • Riot police were on crowd control duty today facing off a mob of Gilet Jaunes
  • Rifles at demonstration by unarmed citizens show how Macron crisis intensifies

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Are Imaging Scans Worth It?

By Jacob Teitelbaum – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

We’ve known for decades that spinal X-rays, MRIs and CT scans add very little information about back pain. They most often don’t tell doctors whether the pain is coming from the spine or from disc, arthritic or bone disease (though they may reveal if the problem can be fixed with a chiropractic adjustment.)

Research also shows that, if back pain is present, radiologists tend to interpret x-ray results as confirming the presence of a host of horrific (and scary-sounding) problems. Yet remarkably, if those same radiologists are shown X-rays and MRIs from both healthy people and those with back pain, they can’t tell one group from the other!

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“Constitution Does Not Require Complete Separation Of Church & State” -Lynch v. Donnelly, 1984

By William Federer – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

Justice William Orville Douglas served the longest term on the bench in the Supreme Court’s history — 36 years, until his death JANUARY 19, 1980.

He was one of the eight Supreme Court Justices nominated by Franklin D. Roosevelt.

He previously taught law at Columbia Law School and Yale Law School, and served on the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

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Alabama: Wounded IHOP Employee Shoots & Kills Armed Man Shooting At Employees

By Tim Brown – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

A Huntsville, Alabama International House of Pancakes employee drew his own gun in self-defense and the defense of others after a man began shooting at store employees.  In the process, the employee was wounded but the confrontation ended with the aggressor being killed, according to police.

According to the Associated Press:

The Huntsville Police Department on Thursday identified the two people killed in the Wednesday night shooting as IHOP employee Roy Brown and customer Roderick Turner. Brown was 56. Turner was 25.

In a statement, police said Turner was picking up a carryout order and became “disruptive and loud regarding the service at the business.”

After a confrontation, police said Turner pulled a handgun and started firing at employees, striking Brown and another worker. Police said the wounded employee “then pulled a handgun and shot the customer-shooter in self-defense of others.”

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Failure of UK Renewable Energy Policy

Re-Blogged From WUWT

A new report from the Global Warming Policy Foundation finds that consumers are paying far too much for the emissions reductions delivered by renewable energy. The report, linked here, by Dr Capell Aris, is the result of extensive energy system modelling, and reports the costs, greenhouse gas emissions and grid security delivered by the current grid and by a series of counterfactual energy systems. As Dr Aris explains:

“The dash for gas of the 1990s delivered lower carbon dioxide emissions and lower costs. If we had simply continued, we could now be enjoying electricity prices 30-40% lower than today, with similar carbon dioxide emissions, and vastly better grid security. Consumers are grossly overpaying for a very unreliable system.”

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Gold-Stock Upleg Pauses

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The gold miners’ stocks have slumped in January, tilting sentiment back to bearish.  This sector’s strong December upward momentum was checked by gold’s own upleg stalling out.  Gold investment demand growth slowed on the blistering stock-market rally.  But uplegs always flow and ebb, and this young gold-stock upleg merely paused.  The gold miners’ gains will likely resume soon, rekindling bullish psychology.

Most investors and analysts track the gold-mining sector with its leading ETF, the GDX VanEck Vectors Gold Miners ETF.  GDX was this sector’s pioneering ETF birthed in May 2006, creating a huge first-mover advantage that is insurmountable.  This week GDX’s net assets of $9.9b were an incredible 56.7x larger than the next-biggest 1x-long major-gold-miners ETF!  GDX dominates this space with little competition.

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8 Health Hazards Caused by Lack of Vitamin D

By Lynn Allison – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Our bodies need vitamin D for many health benefits but in the cold winter months it may be hard to get enough of this hormone that’s created when your skin is exposed to sunlight.

Without sufficient amounts of vitamin D, you could develop serious heart conditions and weakened bones. Children who have a vitamin D deficiency are at higher risk for developing rickets, a condition where their bones become soft and weak.

The Mayo Clinic recommends 400 international units or I.U.’s daily for children up to one year old, 600 I.U’s for those from one to 70 years of age and 800 I.U’s for folks over 70.

Stem Cell Transplant Helps Some With MS

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A stem cell transplant may help some people with multiple sclerosis when standard drugs fail, a new clinical trial finds.

The study focused on 110 patients with aggressive cases of MS: Their symptoms had flared up at least twice in the past year despite taking standard medication, and they’d already tried an average of three of those drugs.

Researchers randomly assigned the patients to either keep trying other medications or have a stem cell transplant — using cells taken from their own blood.

Over an average of three years, MS progressed in 34 of 55 patients on medication — meaning their disabilities worsened. That compared with only three of 55 patients given a stem cell transplant.

Experimental Diabetes Drug

By Health Day – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

An experimental drug may help people with type 2 diabetes curb their blood sugar without causing it to drop to dangerously low levels.

Researchers found that the compound — dubbed TTP399 for now — improved patients’ blood sugar control when it was added to the standard medication metformin for six months. And it did so without causing hypoglycemia — blood sugar drops that, if severe, can lead to convulsions or loss of consciousness.

The findings, published Jan. 16 in the journal Science Translational Medicine, come from an earlier Phase 2 trial. And more research is needed before TTP399 can be added to existing armaments against type 2 diabetes, said senior researcher Carmen Valcarce.

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Gold Surges On Stock Selloff

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Gold investment demand reversed sharply higher in recent months, fueling a strong gold rally.  The big stock-market selloff rekindled interest in prudently diversifying stock-heavy portfolios with counter-moving gold.  These mounting investment-capital inflows into gold are likely to persist and intensify.  Both weaker stock markets and higher gold prices will continue to drive more investment demand, growing gold’s upleg.

Early in Q4’18, gold reached a major inflection point.  It languished during the first three quarters of 2018, down 8.5% year-to-date by the end of Q3.  Investors wanted nothing to do with alternative investments with the stock markets powering to new record highs.  The flagship S&P 500 broad-market stock index (SPX) had rallied 9.0% in the first 3/4ths of last year.  That left gold deeply out of favor heading into Q4.

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Dem Lawmakers Push for $15 Minimum Wage Will Have Disastrous Consequences

By Rachel Greszler – Re-Blogged From Blabber Buzz

House Democrats are looking to double the minimum wage, with little eye to the consequences.

Led by Virginia Democrat Bobby Scott, House Democrats introduced the Raise the Wage Act, which would more than double the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 per hour by the year 2024.

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Elizabeth Warren Mulling Tax on Wealthy Americans

By Jason Devaney – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., appears to be borrowing an idea from a new member of the opposite chamber by considering a wealth tax on the richest Americans.

According to The Washington Post, economists working with Warren — who recently formed an exploratory committee to look into running for president in next year’s election — are working on the plan with her.

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Wyoming Legislators Want State to De-Risk Investments by Holding Gold and Silver

Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

A group of Wyoming legislators have introduced three bills this week to de-risk the state’s financial holdings with modest allocations to physical gold and silver in the state’s pension fund, reserve fund, and mineral trust fund.

Introduced by Representative Roy Edwards (R-Gillette) and co-sponsored by 15 others, the Wyoming Sound Money Trust Act (HB 174) empowers the State Treasurer to hold at least 10% of the Permanent Wyoming Mineral Trust Fund in the monetary metals in a depository in or near the state of Wyoming.

The Permanent Wyoming Mineral Trust Fund is the state’s oldest and most well-funded permanent fund with over $8 billion in assets.

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US Government Debt Bomb Much Higher Than Americans Realize

By SRSrocco – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The U.S. Federal debt bomb continues to increase, even with the government shut down.  In just one day, the U.S. public debt increased $50 billion on Jan 15th.  While the total outstanding Federal debt has now reached nearly $22 trillion, it doesn’t include all U.S. government debt.

That’s correct… there’s a lot more debt than Americans realize sitting on the balance sheet of the U.S. Government.  For example, there are other obligations such as U.S Government Agency Debt that isn’t well-known.  According to the USGovernmentSpending.com website, U.S. Agency debt is the amount of outstanding debt issued by federal agencies (such as FHLB and GNMA) and government-sponsored enterprises (such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac).  The amount of U.S. Agency debt

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CO2 and Crops: NAS vs. Science

By David Burton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

One of the most pernicious examples of disinformation promoted by the Climate Industry is the claim that manmade climate change from CO2 emissions threatens agriculture and “food security.” That’s the exact opposite of the truth. CO2 is “plant fertilizer,” and hundreds of agricultural studies have shown that higher CO2 levels are dramatically beneficial for agriculture, to levels far above what we can ever hope for outdoors.

Most plants grow best with daytime atmospheric CO2 of at least about 1500 ppmv. That’s about what CO2 levels are thought to have averaged during the Cretaceous. It’s 1090 ppmv higher than the current average outdoor level of about 410 ppmv.

In other words, most plants would grow best if CO2 levels were increased by more than eight times the measly 130 ppmv by which mankind has managed to increase CO2 levels since the “pre-industrial” Little Ice Age. (Levels even higher than that wouldn’t hurt plants, but they wouldn’t help much, either.)

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Debt, Division, Dysfunction, and the March to National Bankruptcy

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals Exchange

Never in our lifetimes has American politics been so marked by division and dysfunction.

The longest partial government shutdown in history occurred after the Democrat-controlled Congress wouldn’t compromise with President Trump on a border wall. The impasse is but one symptom of a deeper malady – one that threatens to wreak wider social and financial instability in the years ahead.

Put plainly, the pillars of the American system as we have known it are eroding.

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Of Discount Rates and Candy-Canes

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley -Re-Blogged From WUWT

“The time has come,” the Walrus said,

“To talk of many things:

Of shoes and ships and sealing-wax,

Of cabbages and kings,

And why the sea is boiling hot,

And whether pigs have wings.”

Lewis Carroll, Aliciae per speculum transitus

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #344

The Week That Was: 2019-01-19, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “Truth never dies but lives a wretched existence,”— Yiddish proverb [H/t Tim Ball.

Number of the Week: Advancing to # 3?

The Weather Engine: Last week’s TWTW discussed the two primary energy flows from the surface through the atmosphere into space as speculated in the influential 1979 Charney report: 1) carbon dioxide (CO2) absorbing and re-radiating (interfering with) some of the outbound long-wave radiation from the surface to space and 2) increased water vapor absorbing and re-radiating (interfering with) even more outbound long-wave radiation. According to the Charney Report, the increased water vapor is more significant than the CO2 in causing a warming of the planet.

Further, TWTW discussed the 1997 model of the earth’s “Annual Global Mean Energy Budget” as presented by Kiehl and Trenberth paper published by the American Meteorological Society. In their graph, Figure 7, one can see the component allocated to outgoing longwave radiation and the component allocated to increasing water vapor, evapotranspiration and latent heat. Other publications disagree with the specific numbers but accept the concept.

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China: No Wind Or Solar If It Can’t Beat Coal On Price

By John Parnell – Re-Blogged From Forbes

China has said it will not approve wind and solar power projects unless they can compete with coal power prices.

Beijing pulled the plug on support for large solar projects, which had been receiving a per kWh payment, in late May. That news came immediately after the country’s largest solar industry event and caught everyone by surprise.

Officials are understood to have been frustrated at seeing Chinese suppliers and engineering firms building solar projects overseas that delivered electricity at prices far below what was available back home.

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Federal Reserve Confesses Sole Responsibility for All Recessions

In a surprisingly candid admission, two former Federal Reserve chairs have stated that the Federal Reserve alone is responsible for creating all recessions in the United States.

First, former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke said that

Expansions don’t die of old age. They get murdered.

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The Climate Paper Most Widely Covered By The Media In 2018 Was Actually A Call For Global Socialism

By Michael Bastasch, From The Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Actually A Call For Global Socialism

The most popular climate paper of 2018 called for “collective human action” to keep global warming from turning Earth into a “hothouse,” according to media tracking data.

The so-called “Hothouse Earth” paper, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in August, sparked a wave of alarming media coverage the planet was “dangerously close” to reaching “unstoppable” warming.

“The paper was the fifth most talked-about of all journal papers published last year,” and the most talked about paper related to global warming, according to the website Carbon Brief. (RELATED: Ocasio-Cortez’s ‘Green New Deal’ Would Avert A ‘Barely Detectable’ Amount Of Global Warming)

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Tests May Help Diagnose Alzheimer’s Earlier

By Health Day – Tr-Blogged From Newsmax Health

Leaky blood vessels in the brain may be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say.

They followed 161 older adults for five years and found that those with the most severe memory declines had the greatest leakage in their brain’s blood vessels, regardless of whether the Alzheimer’s-related proteins amyloid and tau were present.

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Government Shutdown Imperils Earth’s Magnetic Field!!!

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Well… maybe not imperiling Earth’s magnetic field… Just delaying the release of the vital World Magnetic Model…

NEWS 09 JANUARY 2019

Earth’s magnetic field is acting up and geologists don’t know why

Erratic motion of north magnetic pole forces experts to update model that aids global navigation.

Update, 9 January: The release of the World Magnetic Model has been postponed to 30 January due to the ongoing US government shutdown.

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Wind Turbines are Neither Clean Nor Green and They Provide Zero Global Energy

– Re-Blogged From The Spectator

The Global Wind Energy Council recently released its latest report, excitedly boasting that ‘the proliferation of wind energy into the global power market continues at a furious pace, after it was revealed that more than 54 gigawatts of clean renewable wind power was installed across the global market last year’.

You may have got the impression from announcements like that, and from the obligatory pictures of wind turbines in any BBC story or airport advert about energy, that wind power is making a big contribution to world energy today. You would be wrong. Its contribution is still, after decades — nay centuries — of development, trivial to the point of irrelevance.

We urgently need to stop the ecological posturing and invest in gas and nuclear

Another Climate Propaganda Story Promoting the Normal as Abnormal

By Dr. Tim Ball – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Almost every day there are stories in the media about weather or climate events that create the impression that they are new and outside of the normal pattern. None of them are. The objective is to sensationalize the story, even if it means using a meaningless period. A simple trick is to pick a period in which your claim is valid. This practice of cherry-picking the period of study is not exclusive to the media. It was a clear sign of corruption of climatology brought to a head with Roseanne D’Arrigo’s infamous comment to the 2006 National Academy of Science (NAS) panel that “if you are going to make a cherry pie, you have to pick cherries.”

That doesn’t condone the media use of the technique. All it does is illustrate why it was a convenient technique for creating a deception about what is normal. For example, a 2017 BBC headline said “Hottest June day since summer of 1976 in heatwave.” That is 41 years, which is statistically significant but not climatologically significant. A Youtube story reports “Sydney has wettest November day since 1984.” CBS Pittsburgh reported “NWS: 2018 is the 2nd Wettest Year on Record in Pittsburgh.” The record began in 1871 or 147 years ago, but even that is not climatologically significant. The ones I like are this one from North Carolina, that says, “A Look Back at the Coldest day Ever in North Carolina.” “Ever” is approximately 4.5 billion years.

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Silver Price – 1993 And 2001 Repeat

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The M2 measure of money supply has increased about 6.7% per year since 1971 when President Nixon severed the last hint of gold backing the dollar. The subsequent deluge of digital dollars levitated prices for oil, trucks, hamburgers, the S&P 500 Index, silver and almost everything else. Examine the log scale graph of M2 and smoothed silver prices. M2 rises, while silver prices increase to unsustainable levels, fall too low and then rise again.

In late 2018 silver prices are too low! They hit bottom in December 2015 and have risen since then. First slowly, then rapidly, as Hemingway said…

Analysis: Silver prices are too low.

Silver prices rise along with M2, but they are now well below trend. This graph shows that silver could rise above $30 in 2019.

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UK’s May Faces No-Confidence Vote After Brexit Plan Crushed

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

British lawmakers on Tuesday overwhelmingly rejected Prime Minister Theresa May’s divorce deal with the European Union, plunging the Brexit process into chaos and leading to a no-confidence vote in her government.

Moments after the vote, May said it was only right to test whether the government still had lawmakers’ support to carry on. Lawmakers will vote Wednesday in a no-confidence motion from opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn that could trigger a national election.

The House of Commons’ 432-202 vote against May’s plan was widely expected, but it was still devastating for her fragile leadership. It came after more than two years of political upheaval — and was the biggest defeat for a government in the House of Commons in more than a century.

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New York’s Green New Deal

Re-Blogged From WUWT

I can’t vouch for the provenance of this, but it seems real, ~ctm

On January 15, 2019 New York State Governor Andrew M. Cuomo did his State of the State Address. His 2019 Justice Agenda included 12 proposals under part 4 “Launching the Green New Deal”:

· Mandate 100 Percent Clean Power by 2040 – This will mandate that all electricity will be “carbon free by 2040.

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Greenland Is Way Cool

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

As a result of a tweet by Steve McIntyre, I was made aware of an interesting dataset. This is a look by Vinther et al. at the last ~12,000 years of temperatures on the Greenland ice cap. The dataset is available here.

Figure 1 shows the full length of the data, along with the change in summer insolation at 75°N, the general location of the ice cores used to create the temperature dataset.

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Antarctica and “Alarming” Sea Level Rise

By Rud Istvan – Re-Blogged From WUWT

WUWT reader KS of North Dakota emailed a request to ctm based on reading ‘alarming’ Wired journalism concerning $50 million being spent to further study the ‘dangerous’ Thwaites glacier in Antarctica. KS asked if WUWT could perhaps produce a factual overview. ctm asked me to provide it, since I had written an extensive essay ‘Tipping Points’ in ebook Blowing Smoke on this very sea level rise (SLR) subject (and more). What follows is a lightly rewritten and slightly expanded/updated excerpt for KS and the rest of WUWT.

There are only three ice sheets in the world with the potential to accelerate SLR to alarming levels: Greenland, the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS).

In ‘theory’ Greenland could melt, since there is observed summer melting. It cannot calve (slide into) into the sea (although there are fringe glaciers like Jacobshaven that do, the Titanic sinking being evidence) because Greenland is bowl shaped. At the observed average annual ice mass loss of the past ~2.5 decades (from 1990) Greenland would theoretically take 27000 years to melt. At the ice mass loss rate since 2000, it would only take 14000 years and would increase SLR by a distinctly unalarming ~0.5mm/yr. In reality, given Greenland’s latitude and central ice sheet elevation, melting is impossible—as ice cores reaching back to the Eemian prove. Calculations and references behind this brief summary are provided in ‘Tipping Points’.

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Pension Fund Problem Just Got Much Worse

By Bloomberg – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

The 14 percent drop in the S&P 500 Index last quarter has big implications for state and local pension funds, which probably saw the value of their assets fall by about 7 percent. Investors with the benefit of a long-term horizon have the ability to ignore market dips, and pension funds are among the longest-term investors, but their problems are not long-term and further short-term declines could precipitate a crisis.

The table below shows pension fund assets and liabilities as compiled by Pew Charitable Trusts. There is a large and growing gap, but that’s not the primary problem. Although the value of those assets is known with reasonable accuracy, the liability figure is based on assumptions about the future. The actuarial and political assumptions are uncertain, but it is the investment assumptions – plans assume an average discount rate of 7 percent – that are the most problematic.

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Has The Fed Already Gone Too Far?

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From PentoPort

It is crucial for investors to understand that the Federal Reserve has not yet turned dovish and the Fed “Put” it not yet in place. Wall Street sometimes hears what it desperately needs, but that does not make it fact. While Jerome Powell has moved incrementally towards the dovish side of the ledger in the past few weeks, the Fed is still firmly in hawkish territory. If, however, Mr. Powell was actively reducing the Fed Funds Rate (FFR) and expanding the balance sheet, then we would have a dovish Fed. However, by just indicating that the FOMC might be close to finishing its rate hiking campaign, while still selling nearly $50 billion of bonds every month from its balance sheet, the Fed is still tightening monetary policy–and in a big way.

However, “The Fed is now dovish, so it’s a good time to buy stocks” mantra from Wall Street is a dangerous one indeed. This argument is false on two fronts. First, as already mentioned, Jerome Powell is still tightening monetary policy through its reverse QE process. Second, the fact that the Fed may be cutting rates soon doesn’t mean the stock market automatically goes up. The Fed began cutting rates in September of 2007 and reached 0% by December of 2008. Was it a good time to buy stocks during that time? No, it was a very dumb idea that cost you half of your investable assets. The market actually peaked around the same time the Fed began cutting rates and didn’t bottom until March 2009, three months after interest rates hit 0%.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #343

The Week That Was: 2019-01-12, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “There is no such thing as consensus science. If it’s consensus, it isn’t science. If it’s science, itds isn’t consensus. Period.” — Michael Crichton. [H/t William Readdy]

Number of the Week: ZERO

Two Types of Energy Flow: Last week’s TWTW produced several responses with questions that need to be explained further. Forty years of comprehensive atmospheric temperature trends, the last twenty years with no statistically significant warming, and 60 years of balloon observations show that the global atmosphere is not the warming envisioned in the 1970s and early 1980s, for example, in the influential Charney Report of 1979. Yet, the assumptions in these speculated findings are embodied in the “theory” of climate science and the reports of the UN Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) and the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). These government entities have failed to test their findings against atmospheric data, the data set that most clearly reflects the impact of greenhouse gases.

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Where Will The “Pending” Financial Crisis Originate?

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Case for a pending financial collapse is well grounded warns Rickards
– “Ticking time bomb” the Federal Reserve has created is set to go off…

– Economist warns U.S. high-yield debt, default of “junk bonds” could cause next crisis
– Systemic risk is “more dangerous than ever” as “entire system is larger than before”

– Protect wealth by allocating at least 10% of assets in physical gold and silver

Source: BofA Merrill Lynch via Marketwatch.com

from The Daily Reckoning:

The case for a pending financial collapse is well grounded. Financial crises occur on a regular basis including 1987, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2007-08.

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Rising Interest And Prices

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

For years, people blamed the global financial crisis on greed. Doesn’t this make you want to scream out, “what, were people not greedy in 2007 or 1997??” Greed utterly fails to explain the phenomenon. It merely serves to reinforce a previously-held belief. Far be it from us to challenge previously-held beliefs (OK, OK, we may engage in some sacred-ox-goring from time to time), but this is not a scientific approach to explaining observed events. To properly understand a crisis, you have to look for the root cause. And if the crisis did not occur previously, your theory needs to explain why not then, and why only now.

Suppose an old company, XYZ, goes out of business. “Times change,” people say, to explain an economic phenomenon. Or, perhaps slightly less imprecisely, “the market changed.” Sometimes they’ll get even closer to saying something. They say, “Company XYZ did not adapt to changes.”

These statements are copouts.

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Fear of Terrorists Infiltrating Southern Border Is Very Real

MURDOCK: Replace Obamacare with National Market for Health Insurance   By Deroy Murdock – Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

‘Why let even one terrorist breach the border and leave his own bloody mark?’

True or false: Federal agents have caught terrorists on the southern frontier.

True!

Meet nine of them:

  • Abdullah Omar Fidse walked across a bridge over the Rio Grande, from Reynosa, Mexico, to Hidalgo, Texas, in June 2008. He requested asylum, claiming to be a Somali refugee. While in custody for years as officials weighed his case, Fidse told another detainee that he supported al-Qaeda and al-Shabab. His cellphone memory card included the telephone number of Mohamed Suleiman, subsequently arrested for aiding a 2010 al-Shabab suicide-bomb attack in Uganda, which killed 70 soccer fans. Fidse eventually admitted to an undercover informant: “We are terrorists.” As the Center for Immigration Studies’ Todd Bensman reports, Fidse “believed all good Muslims must commit two acts of jihad a year.” U.S. officials scotched Fidse’s asylum claim, prosecuted him for lying to federal agents, and sent him to prison for eight years.

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Liquidity, Money Supply And Insolvency

By Andy Sutton – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Liquidity is becoming of central importance once again. It is frequently mentioned in mainstream media articles, interviews, and ‘educational’ programs.  It was a central point of discussion during the financial market blowout in 2008.

The killing off of a little-known (until it was dead!) data series earlier this year by the not-so-USFed has gotten the beehive buzzing once again about a liquidity crisis – or the possible aversion of one in the short term. It has also gotten things buzzing about the longer term as well.

What Happened

Late in 2017, the St. Louis Fed stopped publishing interbank loan data. Period. Just prior to that, the amount of interbank loans on a weekly basis dropped to zero:

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