Why I Love America

By Dennis Prager – Re-Blogged From Prager University

Dennis Prager has traveled all over the world. But at the end of every trip, he returns home with a new appreciation for America. Why? Because no country is more open, more generous, and has done more for the cause of freedom than America has.

This video is sponsored by Colorado Christian University. CCU is offering a $1,000 scholarship to PragerU subscribers for online classes through CCU Online. Go to Prageru.com/ccu to learn more.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

Report: Almost half of all COVID-19 deaths are linked to nursing homes

Re-Blogged From Informing America

Nearly half of all COVID-19 deaths in the United States are connected to nursing homes and long-term care centers, according to a new report from the New York Times.

The analysis found that there were more than 54,000 residents and workers at nursing homes and long-term care centers who have died from coronavirus-related illnesses. There were over 282,000 people infected at 12,000 senior facilities across the country. COVID-19 cases at nursing homes made up only 11% of all COVID-19 cases, but accounted for approximately 43% of the total U.S. deaths.

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IMF Downgrades Outlook for Global Economy

[The Recession was caused partly by the COVID Pandemic, partly from the lockdowns put in place in over 40 US States, and partly by the economic troubles starting before that (eg. the REPO Rate crisis). These IMF forecasts likely are too optimistic.  –Bob]

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What Were the Benefits of Locking Down?

– Re-Blogged From AIER

The school closures, stay home orders, shuttering of businesses, banning of elective surgeries, closure of physical entertainment events, blocked flights, and sudden imposition of a central plan – it all happened suddenly from mid-March in the course of only a few days, and to enormous shock on the part of people who had previously taken their freedom and rights for granted.

Despite enormous pressure from Washington, eight states did not lock down or used a very light touch: South Dakota, North Dakota, South Carolina, Wyoming, Utah, Arkansas, Iowa, and Nebraska.

new york, closed stores

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California Rules Trucks Must Be Electric

Re-Blogged From CBS News

California regulators approved new rules on Thursday that would force automakers to sell more electric work trucks and delivery vans, a first-of-its-kind rule aimed at helping the nation’s most populous state clean up its worst-in-the-nation air quality.

The rules, which would not take effect until 2024, will require at least 40% of all tractor trailers sold in California to be zero emission by 2035. For smaller trucks, including models like the Ford F-250, 55% of all sales would be zero emission by 2035. The standard is the toughest for delivery trucks and vans, with 75% of sales required to be zero emission by 2035.

California already has similar rules in place for passenger vehicle sales. But no one has yet imposed rules like these for work trucks, which unlike passenger vehicles are purchased with the intent of returning a profit.

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Defaults Are Coming

By Keith Weiner – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

We are reading now about possible regulations for air travel. In brief: passengers might be forced to spend hours at the airport. Authorities will perform medical checks, including possibly needles to draw blood, no lounges, no food or drink on board the plane, masks required at all times, and even denied the use of a bathroom except by special permission.

We would wager an ounce of fine gold against a soggy dollar bill that people will hate this. The majority of vacationers will not want to fly. A holiday is supposed to be fun, and air travel promises to be a lot less fun that it was in March.

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Supreme Court Overrules Previous Court Decision, Approves Permit For Atlantic Coast Pipeline

By Varun Hukeri – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that a permit for the Atlantic Coast Pipeline, a proposed natural gas pipeline which would be built under the Appalachian Trail, would be reinstated.

In a 7 to 2 decision, the justices tossed out a decision from a lower court and ruled that the U.S. Forest Service can grant rights-of-way for developers in land within national forests, the Associated Press reported. Energy companies and the Trump administration supported reinstating the permit, while environmental groups opposed it.

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The European Green Deal is a Bad Deal

By Marcus Holtkoetter – Re-Blogged From AGWeb

The European Commission has a plan to eliminate modern farming in Europe.

The details emerged last month, as part of a “European Green Deal” announced late last year that calls for the continent to become “climate neutral” by 2050.

The commission speaks of “turning climate and environmental challenges into opportunities.” It also talks about “making the transition just and inclusive for all.”

It should have added three words: “except for farmers.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #412

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Quote of the Week: “I can live with doubt and uncertainty and not knowing. I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong. If we will only allow that, as we progress, we remain unsure, we will leave opportunities for alternatives. We will not become enthusiastic for the fact, the knowledge, the absolute truth of the day, but remain always uncertain … In order to make progress, one must leave the door to the unknown ajar.” – Richard Feynman

Number of the Week: 11,000 & 1,600

Dynamics in the Tropics: In 2017, Judith Curry retired from her tenured position as a professor at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where she had been Chair of the department, to focus on her private firm, Climate Forecasts Applications, citing the “craziness” of the field of climate science and the great politization of research funding. She has long recognized that there are major problems in the field, particularly in the dynamics of the atmosphere and the oceans in the tropics. As a climate modeler, she has first-hand knowledge of these problems, yet to be solved.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #411

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Quote of the Week: “’It is a pleasure to stand upon the shore, and to see ships tost upon the sea: a pleasure to stand in the window of the castle and to see the battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth (a hill not to be commanded and where the air is always clear and serene), and to see the errors, and wanderings, and mists, and tempests, in the vale below.’ so always that this prospect be with pity, and not with swelling or pride.” – Of Truth, Francis Bacon (1625)

Number of the Week: 140% more than [of] a very small number is still a very small number

Political Rhetoric: Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Todd Myer, the author of “Eco-Fads: How the Rise of Trendy Environmentalism Is Harming the Environment” discusses how certain politicians use the term science without any special meaning. Myer states:

“The word ‘science’ has been hollowed out by politicians, who have stripped it of its substance and power and replaced them with emotional pabulum. These politicians discard the scientific method and deploy the term merely as a weapon against their opponents.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #410

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Re-Blogged From WUWT

Quote of the Week: “Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is absurd.” – Voltaire

Number of the Week: 25 to 100 times greater

Disruptive Wind: The electrical grid operators provide reliable electricity with narrow tolerances. Generally, grid operators plan that power sources can be shut down for maintenance, usually in the spring and the fall. To keep costs down, grid operators desire to have maximum operating capacity in the summer (cooling) and in the winter (heating). According to the EIA’s description of electricity generating capacity:

To ensure a steady supply of electricity to consumers, operators of the electric power system, or grid, call on electric power plants to produce and place the right amount of electricity on the grid at every moment to instantaneously meet and balance electricity demand.

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Central Bank Hypnosis

By Michael Ballanger – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

One look at the chart of the U.S. financial markets against the backdrop of economic paralysis and suffering and one is immediately filled with a myriad of emotions. Sympathy for those that have been afflicted by the most recent pandemic; fear for the families whose primary breadwinner is now unemployed; confusion toward the proper course of action going forward; and finally outrage at the abject timidity of our citizens in responding to the orders laid down by these insipid politicians in response to the crisis.

As the welfare of future generations hangs in the balance, its tentativeness the direct result of government ineptitude, I keep asking myself a critical question: “When did the backbone of our people turn to mush?” If someone holding political office had told my grandfather to stop ploughing his fields or tending to his livestock because a sickness was spreading throughout the community, that charlatan would have wound up with buckshot adorning his gluteus maximus. How dare any group of elected bureaucrats ordain the shutdown of an economy?

Meet the Small Business Leader Fighting to Reopen Michigan

Re-Blogged From the National Patriotic Post

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Democrats Made the COVID-19 Pandemic Even Worse for Small Business

By Joseph Semprevivo – Re-Blogged From the Western Journal

One hundred thousand. That’s how many small businesses have already closed for good because of the COVID-19 pandemic — and counting. Hundreds of thousands of more closures may be on the way.

Simply put, the U.S. economy is bleeding small businesses. And it’s not just small business owners who are suffering: America’s 30 million small businesses employ nearly 60 million workers — half of the private-sector workforce.

When small business employers suffer, their employees feel the pain too.

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DOJ and state attorneys general likely to bring antitrust lawsuits against Google

The Justice Department and some state attorneys general are reportedly likely to file antitrust lawsuits against Google focused on how it has used its search dominance in the online advertising business.

The Justice Department will likely bring a case as soon as this summer, and some state attorneys general will likely file a case in the fall, according to the Wall Street Journal. The states will be led by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican. DOJ Attorney General William Barr has been leading the Google probe and has considered it a top priority.

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The #COVID19 Emergency Is Over!

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Around the world, both state and local governments looked at wildly exaggerated computer model projections of millions of virus deaths, declared a “State Of Emergency”, and foolishly pulled the wheels off of their own economies. This has caused pain, suffering, and loss that far exceeds anything that the virus might do.

The virus hardly affects anyone—it has killed a maximum of 0.1% of the population in the very worst-hit locations. One-tenth of one measly percent.

Ah, I hear you saying, but that’s just deaths. What about hospitalizations? Glad you asked. Hospitalizations in the worst-hit areas have been about three times that, about a third of one percent of the population. Still not even one percent.

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The Scientific Case for Vacating the EPA’s Carbon Dioxide Endangerment Finding

From The Competitive Enterprise Institute

Patrick J. Michaels – Re-Blogged From WUWT

View Full Document as PDF

Executive Summary

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) 2009 “Endangerment Finding” from carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases grants the agency a legal mandate that can have profound and far-reaching effects. The Finding is based largely on a Technical Support Document that relies heavily upon other mandated reports, the so-called National Assessments of global climate change impacts on the United States.

The extant Assessments at the time of the Endangerment Finding suffered from serious flaws. We document that using the climate models for the first Assessment, from 2000, provided less quantitative guidance than tables of random numbers—and that the chief scientist for that work knew of this problem.

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Seattle Parks without Parking, Washington Beaches without Beachcombers

Reposted from The Cliff Mass Weather Blog

If you want to drive to a major Seattle park, you will not be able to park there.

And if you are looking forward to a walk on a Washington State ocean beach, forget it.  The beaches are off limits.

And at many parks you will be hectored and bullied in way that is contradictory to the values of a free society.

Why?

Because some public officials believe, with virtually no evidence or basis in science, that these restrictions on outdoor areas are promoting public safety.   These politicians and bureaucrats may mean well, but, in reality, they are harming many of those they wish to assist.  They are also working against the most progressive values of our community, taking actions that are inconsistent with the essential principles of our democracy.

There is minimal risk of coronavirus spread outdoors.  That is science.

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Rev. Jesse Jackson Bucks Environmentalists, Pushes Natural Gas Pipeline As Black Neighborhoods Struggle With Sky High Energy Prices

By Chris White, The Daily Caller – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Rev. Jesse Jackson is bucking many of the environmentalists who believe natural gas production perpetuates a world in which climate change is disproportionately hurting black communities.

Jackson is prodding local, state and federal officials in Illinois to okay the construction of a $8.2 million, 30-mile natural-gas pipeline built for a community, Axios noted in a report Monday addressing the reverend’s contrarian position.

The Pembroke, Illinois pipeline would shuttle natural gas into an area of the state that suffers from high energy prices, according to Jackson.

April’s Sales Drop Sets a Record

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Get Ready for Some SERIOUS Sticker Shock as Inflation Heats Up

By Mike Gleason – Re-Blogged From Money Metals

Gold and silver markets are inching closer to achieving major upside breakouts.

On Thursday, gold rallied above a near-term consolidation pattern to close at $1,747 an ounce. That put the monetary metal about $30 away from making new highs for the year. As of this Friday recording, gold prices are marching higher again and come in at $1,761, up 2.5% for the week.

Turning to silver, the white metal gained nearly 3% yesterday to touch a major resistance line just above the $16 per ounce level and the momentum is carrying over into today. A strong weekly close above yesterday’s high could trigger a wave of technical buying that propels prices much higher in the days ahead – and it looks as though such a close is in fact going to happen.

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Gold Miners’ Q1’20 Fundamentals

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The major gold miners’ stocks have rallied dramatically out of mid-March’s stock-panic lows, soaring to new bull-market highs. Their just-reported Q1’20 operational and financial results reveal whether today’s higher gold-stock prices are fundamentally justified. They also illuminate whether this gold-stock upleg is likely to continue powering higher, despite the catastrophic economic damage from governments’ lockdowns.

With officials around the world waging a scorched-earth war against this COVID-19 pandemic, the gold miners’ latest quarterly results are more important than ever. While this earnings season covered Q1’20, most gold companies didn’t release their quarterly reports until the last couple weeks. In them they had to disclose the ongoing impact of governments’ COVID-19 lockdowns current to those quarterlies’ release dates.

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Fireside Chat

Ep. 134 — Which Will Do More Harm: The Virus or the Lockdown?

The LA Times reports that extreme poverty may be the pandemic’s heaviest toll. But it isn’t the virus causing this suffering—it’s the lockdown. Dennis also addresses the latest new media lie about him—these leftists are determined to discredit Dennis, but they are just too easily proven wrong every time they try.

Please watch the VIDEO

CONTINUE READING –>

Coronavirus Swings Society To “Touch Free” Digital ID And Digital Currency

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Our Overcentralized Food Supply Chain is Breaking Down

One of the most important weaknesses in our way of life exposed by the response to the COVID-19 pandemic is our centralized and efficiency-obsessed food supply chain. Concerns about employee safety in our nation’s food processing facilities, combined with the shutdown of schools, hotels, and many restaurants, have distorted farmers’ incentives and resulted in shortages at grocery stores and fast-food restaurants. The solution begins with recognizing that our trade policies are contrary to our national interest and that our regulatory regime is contrary to a risk-mitigating, redundant food system.

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Pseudo-Science behind the Assault on Hydroxychloroquine

By Leo Goldstein – R$e-Blogged From WUWT

This is a research article published as information for health care professionals and public officials, and for an open peer review. It is not medical advice.

Summary

I reviewed the scientific literature on hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azithromycin (AZ), and their use for COVID-19. My conclusions:

  • HCQ-based treatments are effective in treating COVID-19, unless started too late.
  • Studies, cited in opposition, have been misinterpreted, invalid, or worse.

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Oil Price Collapse –> Next Peak Oil Frenzy?

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The ChiCom-19 hostage crisis certainly makes strange bedfellows. Over the past few weeks I have been agreeing with Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price on the need to end the hostage crisis now. In the 35 years, Mr. Price has served as a county commissioner, I don’t think I’ve ever agreed with him before. Matt Egan, lead writer for CNN Business, actually wrote an article about the oil industry that made sense. His work is usually so awful, that it doesn’t even have ridicule value… But, like a “blind squirrel occasionally getting the nut”…

How negative oil prices could set the stage for the next price boom

By Matt Egan, CNN Business

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Big Tech Platforms Can’t Have It Both Ways on Free Speech

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #407

The Week That Was: April 25, 2020

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

Quote of the Week: “So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.” – Franklin Delano Roosevelt – First Inaugural Address (March 4, 1933)

Number of the Week: 3, 4, & 5

Politics Not Science: The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) published a report by Patrick Michaels and Kevin Dayaratna discussing the critical thinking, or lack thereof, that went into the 2009 EPA finding that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases endanger public health and welfare – the Endangerment Finding. The finding is largely based on the first and second US national climate assessments produced by what is now called the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). According to its web site, the legal mandate of the USGCRP is:

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SD Gov. Winning Wuhan Flu Battle w/out Lockdown; Starts Hydroxychloroquine Trials

‘If a leader will take too much power in a time of crisis, that is how we lose our country…’

 1

Wikimedia Commons: South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem has simultaneously kept the state open, protected the liberties of her citizens, and started the first state-wide hydroxychloroquine clinical trials in the nation, all while winning the battle against the Wuhan flu.

Despite negative coverage from the corporate news media, Noem has resisted calls to shut down her state’s businesses, churches, hospitals, and schools, Fox News reported.

“The governor just lets this problem get bigger and bigger and bigger,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren said on “The Rachel Maddow Show.”

Noem has refused to subject South Dakota’s citizens to mass unemployment, which leads to substance abuse, suicide, poverty, and other health issues.. Continue reading

The Next Giant Industry in Need of a Bailout

Well this is starting to become a trend.

Over the past few weeks, state governments across the Land of the Free have been feverishly proposing new legislation that will virtually guarantee the entire insurance industry is wiped out.

The root of the issue has to do with something called business interruption insurance.

Business interruption is a pretty common type of insurance that’s designed to protect business owners against a number of risks.

Governor Gavin Newsom to Close All State Parks and Beaches Across California

By Kira Davis – Re-Blogged From Red State

Bill Melugin of Fox11 News in LA is reporting that his sources in the Governor’s office tell him Gavin Newsom will be sending a memo to police chiefs across the state informing them all state parks and beaches will be closed as of May 1st.

The memo comes after Newsom raged against Newport Beach sunbathers who flocked to the beach over the weekend as the region experienced its first heatwave of the year.

Newport Beach is in Orange County, which currently has 2,252 confirmed COVID cases and 44 deaths. The population of Orange County is about 3.1 million.

At this point, this all just feels vindictive.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #406

The Week That Was: April 18, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “It is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits.” – Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics [H/t Demetris Koutsoyiannis]

Number of the Week: 2 cents

Limits of Models: In the midst of the lock-down of much of the U.S. public and the collapsing economy; some Americans are learning a few important lessons. One, the country is a republic with a written Constitution. As President Trump realized this week, that Constitution grants the Federal government limited powers, even during a health emergency. And two, numerical models are not infallible. Indeed, almost daily, Drs. Birx and Fauci repeat on television that: “this model is only as good as the data we put into it.” Speculation, scenarios or projections, may be interesting but must be supported by evidence fitting the issue. Unfortunately, all too frequently government policy has been based on models using inappropriate data.

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States Face More Push-Back Against Draconian Shelter Orders

Re-Blogged From Liberty Headlines

While many Americans are filled with fear, Melissa Ackison says the coronavirus pandemic has filled her with anger.

The stay-at home orders are government overreach, the conservative Ohio state Senate candidate says, and the labeling of some workers as “essential” arbitrary.

“It enrages something inside of you,” said Ackison, who was among those who protested Republican Gov. Mike DeWine’s orders at the statehouse in Columbus with her 10-year-old son.

She has “no fear whatsoever” of contracting the virus, she said Thursday, dismissing it as hype.

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COMEX Search And Seizure

By Craig Hemke – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

These are dark times for The Bullion Banks. Their Fractional Reserve and Digital Derivative Pricing Scheme is in great peril as refineries, miners, and mints all shut down in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Will these Banks be able to scrounge up enough physical metal to keep their scheme afloat through June? That remains an open question.

You may recall that we’ve been warning of the outrageous volume of COMEX EFPs (Exchange For Physical) for years. For the calendar years 2018 and 2019, the COMEX swapped out over 14,000 metric tonnes of contracts for alleged “physical metal” in London. And this process grew even more extreme in 2020, as the first three weeks of the month saw 290,000 COMEX gold contracts “exchanged” this way. Here’s the link from the last post dedicated to this subject, written on March 10: https://www.sprottmoney.com/Blog/comex-gold-efp-us…

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The Chinese-virus lockdowns that have done their job

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From WUWT

In Italy and Spain, two of Europe’s hardest-hit nations, the compound daily growth rates in cumulative cases of Chinese-virus infection have fallen to 2.8% and 3.4% respectively. The lockdowns in these two countries are, for the first time, being eased.

clip_image002

Fig. 1. Mean compound daily growth rates in confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection for the world excluding China (red) and for several individual nations averaged over the successive seven-day periods ending on all dates from March 28 to April 12, 2020. A link to the high-definition PowerPoint slides is at the end of this posting.

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Welcome To The Hyperinflationary Depression

By Clive Maund – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

The title of Leo Tolstoy’s massive tome, War and Peace, which many have heard of but few have read, implies a cyclical alternation between these conditions, which never ends, no matter how great the level of technological advance, because of the nature of men, which does not change.

It is the same with the great economic cycles which alternate between boom and bust. Once a parasitic overclass gain absolute power and a society is riven with corruption, decadence, graft and nepotism then its downfall is assured and is only a matter of time – and what empowers the parasitic overclass more than anything else is a fiat money system, which enables them to award themselves unlimited funds the better to live off the backs of the labor of everyone else, and no entity on the planet provides a more graphic example of this than the US Federal Reserve.

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Global Shutdown And Gold

Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Have you read Ayn Rand’s novel Atlas Shrugged? The main theme of the book is that – overwhelmed by growing statism – entrepreneurs at one point say finally “basta!” and announce a strike. They disappear, leaving their businesses to their fate. The symbolic Atlas who carries the world, shrugs. As a result, the economy collapses, plunging the world into chaos.

This what we are observing right now. The workers do not go to work. Shopping malls are closed. Restaurateurs shut down their premises. Theatres, cinemas, gyms, swimming pools – they all are out of service. Other companies reduce their activities or even go dormant. The global economy freezes. The only difference from the Rand’s novel that it is not because of the strike but because of a self-defense effort. People want to protect themselves and others against a contagious pathogen. But the result is the same. The collapse of the economy.

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Civil Rights Leaders Rail Against Enviro Activists, Say Natural Gas Benefits Black Communities

Chris White – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Civil rights leaders are criticizing a common talking point among environmentalist activists who say hydraulic fracking disproportionately hurts black people and other minority communities.

Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson and National Urban League president Marc Morial said they oppose an abrupt move away from fracking, according to an Axios report Monday. They said the technique for producing natural gas helps black people who struggle with high energy prices.

Morial was particularly rough on activists who said their anti-fracking position is tie in with social justice matters.

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US States Ditching Reusable Plastic Bag Incentives, to Reduce Covid-19 Contamination Risk

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT

At least one green initiative is facing the chop, as states and retailers worried about Covid-19 re-embrace the hygiene of single use plastic shopping bags.

States Welcome Back Single-Use Plastic Bags to Avoid Contamination

DR. SUSAN BERRY 27 Mar 20201834:55

States that introduced “green” regulations that taxed single-use plastic grocery bags in an effort to eventually annihilate them are now welcoming them back as health officials caution of possible contamination with reusable bags.

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont (D) said Thursday he was suspending the ten-cent tax on single-use plastic bags at grocery stores and other retail businesses as one of his actions “to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.”

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #405

The Week That Was: April 4, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: “If I set forth a concrete proposal in all its particulars, I expose myself to a hundred criticisms on points not essential to the principle of the plan. If I go further in the use of figures for illustration, I am involved more and more in guesswork; and I run the risk of getting the reader bogged in details which may be inaccurate and could certainly be amended without injury to the main fabric.

“Yet if I restrict myself to generalities, I don’t give the reader enough to bite on; and am in fact shirking the issue, since the size, the order of magnitude, of the factors involved isn’t an irrelevant detail.”. – John Maynard Keynes [H/t Kenneth Button in WSJ]

Number of the Week: 20% Loss

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SanFran Bans Virusy REUSABLE Bags — Brings Back Plastic!

‘ I certainly understand why store employees don’t want to handle somebody else’s things…’

Sustainable ‘Green’ Shopping Bags Can Spread the Coronavirus

‘Sustainable’ shopping bags / IMAGE: The Grommet via Youtube

(Joshua Paladino, Liberty Headlines) San Francisco became one of the first cities in the nation to ban plastic bags in 2007, but now the coronavirus pandemic has forced the progressive stronghold to reverse course by banning reusable bags and mandating that customers use plastic bags.

As part of the city’s shelter-in-place order, grocery stores must not permit “customers to bring their own bags, mugs or other reusable items from home,” Politico reported.

San Francisco will force recycling proponents to use single-use plastic bags so that germs are not transmitted from the much-dirtier reusable bags to food and other customers.

The entire state of California banned single-use plastic bags in 2016.

Germany’s Coronavirus Response Shows Bureaucrats Like Fauci Are the Problem

‘Unburdened by a restrictive central regulatory body … private companies moved quickly to mass produce those tests, meaning they could be rolled out rapidly to the population…’

Dr. Fauci Pushes Back on Democrats' Accusations Against Trump: 'He Has Always Listened to What I've Said'

Anthony Fauci / IMAGE: Face the Nation via Youtube

The great hero to emerge from the coronavirus crisis appears to be Dr. Anthony Fauci, the National Institutes for Health’s disease expert who has stood by the side of President Donald Trump and occasionally butted heads with him.

The Left, in particular, has made Fauci a focal point of its coronavirus rhetoric—claiming, when it is convenient to do so, that Trump should step aside and allow ‘experts’ to handle the situation, while generously heaping any blame on the president for a perceived lack of progress.

Trump, going against all instincts, has largely followed the advice of Fauci in areas such as the White House social-distancing guidelines, recently extended through April.

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COVID-19 Tests: The Non-Fake News

By Dvorah Richman – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Our system may not be the fastest, but it’s giving us trustworthy answers

Federal officials recently testified before the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Reform about government responses to the COVID-19 crisis. Committee members exhibited concern and frustration, and engaged in politicized finger-pointing, over what they said was needlessly slow development and distribution of diagnostic tests – particularly as compared to some other countries.

Some praised South Korea for testing more people in one day than the U.S. did in the past two months. Italy and the U.K. also got positive mention. One wonders whether these Oversight Committee members have any real appreciation for the system that they and their predecessors created.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #403

The Week That Was: March 21, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP)

Quote of the Week: “There must be no barriers to freedom of inquiry… There is no place for dogma in science… And we know that as long as men are free to ask what they must, free to say what they think, free to think what they will, freedom can never be lost, and science can never regress.” – J. Robert Oppenheimer [H/t Paul Redfern]

Number of the Week: 365.2422 days.

Fiasco in the Making? Writing in Stat, epidemiologist John Ioannidis of Stanford University emphasizes the need for solid data to address the coronavirus disease, Covid-19. Ioannidis is co-director of Stanford’s Meta-Research Innovation Center, which is dedicated to improving the quality of scientific studies in biomedicine. He writes:

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How Much Human-Caused Global Warming Should We Expect?

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From WUWT

OMG! The world is going to end, and we caused it. This story, in one form or another, goes back to biblical times. According to Genesis (6:9 to 9:17) God decided that humans had sinned too much and must be punished, so he called up a great flood to destroy the world. A similar story also appears in the earlier Epic of Gilgamesh. End of the world predictions are very popular and recur regularly in human history.

More recently, prognosticators have predicted climate change disasters that are due to human actions (sins?). During the Little Ice Age (see Figure 3 in the link), the European public blamed the cold weather on witches and Jews, over 50,000 “witches” and tens of thousands of Jews were killed because they supposedly caused the cold weather and glacial advances. Thus, the idea that humans somehow control climate change is very old. We have no more proof that this is the case today than people had in 800AD, which is about when Archbishop Agobard of Lyons, France said:

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Washington Bill Would Open Up Possibility of Regressive, Harmful Cap-and-Trade Program or Carbon-Dioxide Tax

By Tim Benson – Re-Blogged From WUWT

A bill introduced in the Washington House of Representatives would give the state Department of Ecology (DOE) the authority to create either a carbon-dioxide tax or cap-and-trade system, or both, in the Evergreen State. If passed, DOE could establish each program without any sort of legislative approval.

“Department of Ecology staff could create rules that covered companies that emit as few as 25,000 metric tons of [carbon dioxide],” writes Todd Myers of the Washington Policy Center (WPC). “In Washington state, that would include food producers like El Oro Cattle Feeders in Moses Lake and Lamb Weston in Quincy. It could include timber mills like SDS Lumber in Bingen and Vaagen Brothers in Colville. It would include semiconductor manufacturers and solar panel manufacturers.”

Washington voters have signaled their opposition to a carbon-dioxide tax multiple times in the past half decade, most recently with their thorough rejection of Initiative 1631 (I-1631) in 2018.

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Fleeing California

Re-Blogged From Prager University

Why are millions of people leaving California and moving to other states? What do those states have that California doesn’t? PragerU’s first mini documentary explores the root causes of this mass exodus from the Golden State. “Fleeing California,” featuring PragerU’s own Will Witt, sheds light on one of the most significant but underreported stories of our time.

Please view the VIDEO.

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Virginia Passes Bill to Achieve 100% Carbon-Free Power by 2045

Re-Blogged From Reuters

The Virginia Legislature passed a bill on Friday that puts the state on a path to 100% clean energy by 2045 as part of the commonwealth’s effort to reduce its impact on climate change.

Virginia Senate Bill 851 requires the state to get all its electricity from carbon free sources like renewables and nuclear. It still requires a signature from the governor, who has advanced a similar plan through executive order.

The legislation would also allow fossil plants to operate if they install carbon capture and storage technologies.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #411

The Week That Was: February 29, 2020, Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project

Quote of the Week: If everyone is thinking alike, then no one is thinking.” – Benjamin Franklin

Number of the Week: $61,937

Green Dreams: Many political leaders and political factions have little or no understanding of the importance of reliable, predictable electricity to modern civilization and economic wellbeing. Without thoroughly demonstrated examples of success, a number of local and national governments have passed laws phasing out electricity generated by fossil fuels based on the belief that wind and solar can replace fossil fuels. This “green dream” may become a nightmare.

In the UK, the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF) has produced a set of studies estimating that removing fossil fuels from:

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