Finally, Some Commonsense Western Fire Policies

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

New DOI and DOA policy to cut overgrown, diseased, dead and burned trees is long overdue.

President Trump promised to bring fresh ideas and policies to Washington. Now Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue are doing exactly that in a critically important area: forest management and conflagration prevention. Their actions are informed, courageous and long overdue.

Westerners are delighted, and I’ve advocated such reforms since my days on Capitol Hill in the 1980s.

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Low-Level Radiation Exposure Less Harmful to Health Than Other Modern Lifestyle Risks

[The basis of this article is a report at http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/publications/view/2583. It is based on a review of considerable literature and may go against much that is accepted as true. It’s a slow read, but take a look at this (and other) issues there if you have time. -Bob]

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

From the “I thought sure Fukashima was going to kill me” department

Oxford Martin restatement finds that risks from radiation exposure are extensively studied and small relative to smoking, obesity and air pollution

UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD

Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces. Whilst the risks to human health from medium and high-level radiation are relatively well-understood, the risks at lower levels are less clear. Mixed messages about the safety of low doses of radiation from different sources have created confusion for the public and for policy makers.

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So What Happened to Integrity?

By John Ridgway – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

My father, when he was alive, used to be a wire rope salesman. In that capacity he would tour the coalmines of the North of England, trying to sell the cables by which colliers would be lowered into their abyss. One day during the early 1980s, when prime minister Margaret Thatcher was at her zenith, he returned from work to reveal a startling fact:

“I can predict which coalmine is the next to be closed down,” he proclaimed. We all sat back and listened obediently.

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Yet Another Renewable Energy Boondoggle

By Paul Driessen Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Wilkinson Solar wants to catch the solar wave, and make bundles of money sending electricity to the grid whenever it’s generated, even if it’s not needed at the time. The company’s proposed 288,120 solar panels would blanket 600 acres of now scenic farmland next to a school near the North Carolina coast. The project carries lessons for the rest of America – and all locales considering solar.

Locals are not happy. The electricity would be exported out of the area, which has been hit by Category 3 and 4 hurricanes and multiple tropical storms over the years. Another big one would likely send glass shards flying all over. Meanwhile, the Tar Heel state averages just 213 sunny days per year and 9 hours of bright sun per day; that translates into electricity just 20% of the year – unpredictably, unreliably, less affordably. Carbon dioxide reduction benefits? None. These and other issues must get a full hearing, before regulators issue any approvals.

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Can a Napa Winery Run on a Generator, Not PG&E, Forever?

From The Napa Valley Register – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I’m not a Californian, and this raises questions.
1. The stated reason for the generator is the high cost of running power lines. Is the cost of the power to be delivered just as large a concern?
2. How competitive is a private generator with PG&E rates in Napa?
3. Is California power so expensive that people will begin considering diesel self-generation?

582a47598073c.imageA winery inside caves in hills above Soda Canyon that has generated controversy is facing questions about how it generates electricity.

The Caves at Soda Canyon relies on a generator, not Pacific Gas & Electric, for power. It recently learned that the Bay Area Air Quality Management District won’t give a permit for the existing generator and that it needs a newer, larger model, a county report said.

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Callous CALAS Activists Against the Poor

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Anti-mining groups “protect” local tribe against phony risks by trampling on Guatemalan workers.

Not long ago, supposed “environmental justice” concerns at least involved risks to mine workers and their families. The risks may have been inflated, or ignored for decades, but they were a major focus.

In one case, a state-run mine and smelter had fouled the air, land and water with toxic contaminants in a Peruvian town for 75 years. Environmental groups raised few objections – until a U.S. company bought the properties and began installing modern pollution controls, implementing worker health and safety practices, cleaning up widespread lead dust, and initiating numerous community improvement projects.

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Weekly Climate and Energy News Roundup #282

Brought to You by www.SEPP.org

By Ken Haapala, President, The Science and Environmental Policy Project

Houston Flooding – Resilience Needed: America’s great fortune of no major hurricanes (category 3 or above) making landfall ended after almost 12 years. As stated in last week’s TWTW, Hurricane Harvey made landfall on the Texas coast, between Port Aransas and Port O’Connor (east of Corpus Christi) on Friday night. It was a category 4 hurricane with wind speeds of 130-156 mph (113-136 kt; 209-251 km/h). National Weather Service had predicted a storm surge up to 9 to 13 feet (2.7 to 4 meters) and heavy rainfall of 15 to 30 inches (38 to 76 cm) with up to 40 inches (102 cm) in some locations. Later, it degraded to a tropical storm.

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