Been There, Exceeded That

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Much angst has been expended on a very vague climate threshold, the so-called “2 degrees Celsius limit”, sometimes called the “2° global warming tipping point”.  I find it all quite hilarious, for a reason that will become clear shortly. First a bit of prologue. Here’s the New Republic from 2014 about the two-degree limit:

This Is What Our Hellish World Will Look Like After We Hit the Global Warming Tipping Point

BY REBECCA LEBER, December 21, 2014

The de facto assumption of climate change policy is that the world must limit the increase in global temperatures to 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) above pre-Industrial levels, or risk hitting a tipping point where the impact becomes irreversible.

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The Myth of the Anti-Science Denier

By John Ridgway – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I’ll tell you what you don’t get to see that often nowadays: Death by Chocolate.

There was a time, not so long ago, when no dinner party was complete without a postprandial chuckle over the prospects of slumping dead into one’s pudding bowl. Now, sadly, Death by Chocolate has gone the way of Mississippi Mud Pie and Baked Alaska, never again to menace party-goers with fanciful threats that belie the delicious truth. It all seemed so jocular then.

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The Button Collector Revisited: Graphs, Trends and Hypotheses

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

dotlongdog-blog350Prologue:    This essay is a follow-up to two previous essays on the topic of the usefulness of trend lines [trends] in prediction.  Readers may not familiar with these two essays as they were written years ago, and if you wish, you should read them through first:

  1. Your Dot: On Walking Dogs and Warming Trends posted in Oct 2013 at Andy Revkin’s NY Times Opinion Section blog, Dot Earth. Make sure to watch the original Doggie Walkin’ Man animation, it is only 1 minute long.
  2. The Button Collector or When does trend predict future values? posted a few days later here at WUWT (but 4 years ago!)

Trigger Warning:  This post contains the message “Trends do not and cannot predict future values” .  If this idea is threatening or potentially distressing, please stop reading now.

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Wandering Thru The Tides

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

I got to thinking about the records of the sea level height taken at tidal stations all over the planet. The main problem with these tide stations is that they measure the height of the sea surface versus the height of some object attached to the land … but the land isn’t sitting still. In most places around the planet the land surface is actually rising or falling, and in some places, it’s doing so at a surprising rate, millimeters per year.

The places that are the most affected, unfortunately, are the places where we have some of the longest tidal records, the northern extra-tropics and northern sub-polar regions. In those sub-polar regions, during the most recent ice age, there were trillions of tonnes of ice on the land. This squashed the land underneath the ice down towards the center of the earth … and as result of that, just like when you squeeze a balloon it bulges out elsewhere, the extra-tropical areas further from the North Pole bulged upwards in response to the northern areas being pushed down.

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Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

This is the seventh and last post in my series on the hazards of climate change. In this post we examine the effects of climate change on glaciers and sea level rise. The first six examined the effect of humans on the environment, the effect of the growing human population, climate change and the food supply, the cost of global warming, the effect of man and climate change on extinctions, climate (or weather) related deaths, and extreme weather and climate change.

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