You Cannot Go Wrong With Gold

By Egon von Greyerz – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

This is probably the most important article I have penned. It is about the destiny of three individuals who all followed different tides. We are today at the point when the consequences of taking the wrong tide will be ruinous whilst the right one will be extremely propitious.

I have quoted Brutus’ speech in Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar many times in the last twenty years. But I believe that it is today more relevant than at any time in history, when it comes to economic affairs.

There is a tide in the affairs of men.
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.

Shakespeare – Julius Caesar

The moral of the story will be obvious. The outcomes are so vastly different that anyone who reads about the three human destinies below will easily sympathise with the one who took the tide that “leads to fortune” rather than the two who ended up “in miseries.”

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Macy’s to Close 125 Stores as It Seeks to Reinvent Itself

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

Macy’s said Tuesday it is closing 125 of its least productive stores and cutting 2,000 corporate jobs as the struggling department store tries to reinvent itself in the age of online shopping.

The store closures represent about one fifth of Macy’s current total. They include about 30 that are in the process of closing and account for $1.4 billion in annual sales.

Macy’s didn’t specify how many jobs would be lost at the shuttered stores.

The corporate jobs will be shed as Macy’s closes its offices in Cincinnati and San Francisco, leaving New York as its sole corporate headquarters. Macy’s said that the 2,000 jobs to be lost account for about 9% of its corporate workforce.

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Big Trouble with Spiders

By Kip Hansen — Re-Blogged From WUWT

How deeply have you considered the social life of spiders?  Are they social animals or solitary animals?  Do they work together?  Do they form social networks?  Does their behavior change as in  “adaptive evolution of individual differences in behavior”?

In yet another blow to the sanctity of peer-reviewed science and a simultaneous win for personal integrity and self-correcting nature of science, there is an ongoing tsunami of retractions in a field of study of which most of us have never even heard.

only_here_for_spiders

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Nature Has Been Removing Excess CO2 4X Faster than IPCC Models

By Roy W. Spencer, Ph. D. – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Note: What I present below is scarcely believable to me. I have looked for an error in my analysis, but cannot find one. Nevertheless, extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, so let the following be an introduction to a potential issue with current carbon cycle models that might well be easily resolved by others with more experience and insight than I possess.

Summary

Sixty years of Mauna Loa CO2 data compared to yearly estimates of anthropogenic CO2 emissions shows that Mother Nature has been removing 2.3%/year of the “anthropogenic excess” of atmospheric CO2 above a baseline of 295 ppm. When similar calculations are done for the RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) projections of anthropogenic emissons and CO2 concentrations it is found that the carbon cycle models those projections are based upon remove excess CO2 at only 1/4th the observed rate. If these results are anywhere near accurate, the future RCP projections of CO2, as well as the resulting climate model projection of resulting warming, are probably biased high.

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Handheld Device “Prints” New Skin Directly Onto Wounds

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

And it just passed a test on pigs with flying colors.

In 2018, Canadian scientists unveiled a handheld device that “prints” sheets of artificial skin directly onto the wounds of burn victims.

“The analogy is a duct tape dispenser,” researcher Axel Günther told Smithsonian Magazine at the time, “where instead of a roll of tape you have a microdevice that squishes out a piece of tissue tape.”

On Tuesday, the team published the promising results of its latest trial of the device in the journal Biofabrication — putting it one step closer to actual use in burn clinics.

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GDP Is In…And Recession Is Out…Or Is It?

By David Haggith – Re-Bloggred From Gold Eagle

Having predicted last year that a recession would begin in the summer of 2019 and that it would likely start with a major repo crisis, I am now proven wrong by 2019’s fourth-quarter GDP. If the repo crisis that started in the final week of summer had actually been the start of a recession, we would have seen fourth-quarter GDP go negative. Instead, it came in at 2.1% growth.

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Coronavirus And Credit…A Perfect Storm

This article posits that the spread of the coronavirus coincides with the downturn in the global credit cycle, with potentially catastrophic results. At the time of writing, analysts are still trying to get to grips with the virus’s economic impact and they commonly express the hope that after a month or two everything will return to normal. This seems too optimistic.

The credit crisis was already likely to be severe, given the combination of the end of a prolonged expansionary phase of the credit cycle and trade protectionism. These were the conditions that led to the Wall Street crash of 1929-32. Given similar credit cycle and trade dynamics today, the question to be resolved is how an overvaluation of bonds and equities coupled with escalating monetary inflation will play out.

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