The Gently Rotting Debt-Ridden EU

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

The EU (Euro Union) as a political construction is in a state of terminal decay. We know this for one reason and one reason alone: its core principal is the state is superior to its people. A system of government can only work over the longer term if it recognises that it is the servant of the people, not its master. It matters not what electoral system is in place, so long as this principal is adhered to.

The EU executive in Brussels does not accept electoral primacy. It shares with Marxist communism a belief in statist primacy instead. The only difference between the two creeds is Marx planned to rule the world, while Brussels is on the way to ruling Europe.

Continue reading

Advertisements

European Implosion Sends Panic Through Global Markets

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

told you to keep your eyes on Europe.  On Tuesday, widespread panic shot through European financial markets and this deeply affected U.S. markets as well.  The Dow Jones industrial average fell 391 points, and at this point the Dow and the S&P 500 have been down for three trading sessions in a row.  But the big news is what is happening over in Europe.  Tuesday’s crash represented the largest one day move for 2 year Italian bonds ever, and Italian bank stocks are now down a whopping 24 percent from their April highs.

Continue reading

Italy Looms on the Eurozone’s Horizon

By Adriano Bosoni – Re-Blogged From Stratfor

The skies may not be clear, but these days Europe’s leaders are more relaxed than they were when the year began under foreboding clouds. Economic growth is gaining momentum and unemployment is slowly going down. More important, voters in France rejected candidates opposed to the European Union, and moderate forces will remain in power after September’s general elections in Germany. But while things are relatively calm in the eurozone’s two main economies, the next big challenge for the currency area will come from its third-largest member, Italy. The country has to hold general elections by May, and the vote will take place amid discontent with the status quo, which in many cases includes skepticism about the euro. Given the size of the Italian economy and the depth of its problems, the country’s politics could have consequences far beyond Italy’s borders.

Continue reading

Brexit Triggered…And Why Britain Should Succeed In The Negotiations

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

This is the week that Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty was triggered, and the two years of negotiation between the UK and the EU commenced. Following this period, the UK formally leaves the EU. It is the first time a member state is leaving the EU, so the procedures are untested and the outcome uncertain. But it is not the first Brexit, as historian David Starkey has pointed out. Henry VIII gave similar notice to Rome and through several Acts of Parliament between 1532-34, removed papal powers and tithes, and achieved his Brexit. The chief Remainers, his Chancellor Sir Thomas Moore and Cardinal John Fisher, were executed in 1535.

Today’s Remainers can expect kinder treatment. But Britain has never been entirely happy giving away the legal supremacy from Parliament won by Good King Hal. When Britain joined the Common Market in January 1973, it was a trade bloc that made some strategic sense. The fashion was to belong to trading blocs, in the belief that the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), the forerunner to the World Trade Organisation, was not strong enough protection from trade barriers.

Continue reading

Thank You, America!

By Christopher Monckton of Brenchley – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

head for the brexit

For my final broadcast to the nation on the eve of Britain’s Independence Day, the BBC asked me to imagine myself as one of the courtiers to whom Her Majesty had recently asked the question, “In one minute, give three reasons for your opinion on whether my United Kingdom should remain in or leave the European Union.”

My three reasons for departure, in strict order of precedence, were Democracy, Democracy, and Democracy. For the so-called “European Parliament” is no Parliament. It is a mere duma. It lacks even the power to bring forward a bill, and the 28 faceless, unelected, omnipotent Kommissars – the official German name for the shadowy Commissioners who exercise the supreme lawmaking power that was once vested in our elected Parliament – have the power, under the Treaty of Maastricht, to meet behind closed doors to override in secret any decision of that “Parliament” at will, and even to issue “Commission Regulations” that bypass it altogether.

Continue reading

Brexit Vote

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

David Cameron, Britain’s Prime Minister, has negotiated terms with the other EU member states, which he feels justified to put to voters in an in/out referendum called for 23rd June. At this early stage in the campaign, the terms are not sufficient to give a clear lead in favour a vote to stay, contributing to a slide in sterling on the foreign exchanges. However, if voters do vote to leave the EU, it won’t be just sterling which suffers, but the euro will face considerable challenges as well.

It is thought that arranging for the referendum to be held at the earliest possible date will limit disaffection with the EU. Within this time-scale, the strategy is to emphasise the dangers of Brexit, highlight the advantages of being able to influence EU policies from within, and to emphasise the security benefits of being in as opposed to out. It is essentially a weak and negative campaign strategy designed to scare the electorate against change. Negative campaigns are a weak strategy, which tend to wane through repetition.

Continue reading