Of Tests and Confirmed Cases

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

I’ve been saying for some time now that the number of confirmed cases is a very poor way to measure the spread of the coronavirus infection. This, I’ve said, is because the number of new cases you’ll find depends on how much testing is being done. I’ve claimed that if you double your tests, you’ll get twice the confirmed cases.

However, that position was based on logic alone. I did not have one scrap of data to support or confirm it.

Max Roser is the data display genius behind the website Our World In Data. He has recently finished his coronavirus testing dataset, covering the patchwork quilt of testing in various countries. The data is available here.

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Climate Change – Ebb and Flow of the Tide –Part 2 of 3

By Dr Kelvin Kemm – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Continued from Part 1

Emotional, agenda-driven politics confronts sound, evidence-based science

The topic of global warming and climate change is far more scientifically complex than the public is led to believe.

Myriads of newspaper, magazine and TV items over decades have tended to simplify the science to the point at which the general public believes that it is all so simple that any fool can see what is happening. Public groups often accuse world leaders and scientists of being fools, if they do not instantly act on simple messages projected by individuals or public groups.

One often hears phrases like: ‘The science is settled.’ It is not. Even more worrying is that the reality of the correct science is actually very different to much of the simple public perception.

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Epidemiology, Diet Soda and Climate Science

By Kip Hansen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Epidemiologyis the study and analysis of the distribution (who, when, and where), patterns and determinants of health and disease conditions in defined populations. “

“It is the cornerstone of public health, and shapes policy decisions and evidence-based practice by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for preventive healthcare.”

featured_image_epidemiology

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California, Temperatures, and Acres Burned

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Inspired by the work done by Robert Rohde attempting to link May to October temperatures and rainfall to fires, I thought I’d take a look at the acres burned over the years. Rohde compared the rainfall and temperature records and highlighted the largest fires. However, this gives only a few data points. I wanted a larger view of the situation.

So instead of major fires, I looked at the areas burned every year, which are available here. There is complete data from 1959 to 2016, and the last two years are available here and here.

The first thing I did was run a multiple regression on the data, using both May to October temperature and May to October rainfall to see how well they would predict the area burned. To my great surprise, I found out that rainfall is not significantly correlated with the area burned. Here is that result:

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2018 U.S. tornadoes on Track to be Lowest Ever

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From WUWT

While claims of increased severe weather due to “climate change” aka “global warming” are thrown about by the media, with recent claims that more and more tornadoes are shifting east in the U.S., the fact of the matter is that the trend for strong tornadoes is decidedly down, according to data from NOAA. The US is on track to have the lowest annual tornado count in 65 years.

h/t to Mark J. Perry, AEI for the graph.

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ADHD, Parkinson’s New-Found Link Even Stronger With Ritalin

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

ADHD is tied to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease, with the new-found link even much stronger when Ritalin and other medications are used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, suggests a study published Wednesday in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.

About 11 percent of children across the U.S. have been diagnosed with ADHD, but until now little research has been conducted into the long-term health effects of the disorder and medication used to treat it, WebMD reported.

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Researcher: Beware Scientific Studies — Most Are Wrong

By AFP – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A few years ago, two researchers took the 50 most-used ingredients in a cookbook and studied how many had been linked with a cancer risk or benefit, based on a variety of studies published in scientific journals.

The result? Forty out of 50, including salt, flour, parsley, and sugar. “Is everything we eat associated with cancer?” the researchers wondered in a 2013 article based on their findings.

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