Water Scarcity in Cape Town

By Michael Stahl – weather.com

In January 2018, officials in Cape Town — a port city on South Africa’s southwest coast that’s home to four million people — announced that the municipality was running out of water. By then, Cape Town had experienced three consecutive years of drought, culminating with its most arid year on record in 2017. Legislators believed that on April 12, 2018, they would be forced to shut down the entire water-supply system until local reservoirs somehow became reinvigorated.

Theewaterskloof Dam during Cape Town water crisis

(Getty Images/Evan Hallein)

Desperate Efforts to Drag the Climate Change Drought Narrative Back on Track

By Eric Worrall – Re-Blogged From WUWT 

Aussie Climate Scientists are rushing to fill the breach caused by Professor Andy Pitman’s stunning admission there is no long term drying trend in drought prone Australia.

 

Link between climate change and drought
h/t JoNova – a slide from Professor Pitman’s presentation in June 2019

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Climate Change Could Revive Medieval Megadroughts in US Southwest

By Earth Institute at Columbia U – Re-Blogged From EurekAlert

About a dozen megadroughts struck the American Southwest during the 9th through the 15th centuries, but then they mysteriously ceased around the year 1600. What caused this clustering of megadroughts — that is, severe droughts that last for decades — and why do they happen at all?

If scientists can understand why megadroughts happened in the past, it can help us better predict whether, how, and where they might happen in the future. A study published today in Science Advances provides the first comprehensive theory for why there were megadroughts in the American Southwest. The authors found that ocean temperature conditions plus high radiative forcing — when Earth absorbs more sunlight than it radiates back into space — play important roles in triggering megadroughts. The study suggests an increasing risk of future megadroughts in the American Southwest due to climate change.

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The Water Future of Earth’s ‘Third Pole’

By: Carol Rasmussen – Re- Blogged From WUWT

Himalaya. Karakoram. Hindu Kush. The names of Asia’s high mountain ranges conjure up adventure to those living far away, but for more than a billion people, these are the names of their most reliable water source.

Snow and glaciers in these mountains contain the largest volume of freshwater outside of Earth’s polar ice sheets, leading hydrologists to nickname this region the Third Pole. One-seventh of the world’s population depends on rivers flowing from these mountains for water to drink and to irrigate crops.

Rapid changes in the region’s climate, however, are affecting glacier melt and snowmelt. People in the region are already modifying their land-use practices in response to the changing water supply, and the region’s ecology is transforming. Future changes are likely to influence food and water security in India, Pakistan, China and other nations.

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Sierra Nevada Snowpack at 162 Percent of Normal, California Water Supply Dream

I notice they avoided calling it a *** dream

From The Watchers – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Posted by TW on April 3, 2019 at 19:46 UTC (1 day ago)
Categories: Featured articles, Ice & snow, Water crisis

Sierra Nevada snowpack at 162 percent of normal, California water supply dream

They note:

Snowpack at the station was at 200% of average while statewide snowpack is 162% of average.

“This is great news for this year’s water supply, but water conservation remains a way of life in California, rain or shine,” California Department of Water Resources said.

The state has experienced more than 30 atmospheric rivers since the start of the water year, six in February alone, and statewide snow water equivalent has nearly tripled since February 1, officials said.

Phillips Station now stands at 106.5 inches (270.5 cm) of snow depth and a snow water equivalent of 51 inches (129.5 cm), which is 200% of average for the location. Statewide, the Sierra Nevada snowpack is 162% of average.

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California’s ‘Permanent Drought’

Re-Blogged From WUWT

From the “children just won’t know what drought is” department.

A few years ago, some genius politicians, spurred on by some equally genius “climate scientists” told the citizens of California that we were now in a “permanent drought” situation. Of course, the NYT bought this drivel, and made it a headline.

We here at WUWT called bullshit on it, and now we can say “told you so” with impudence. A mere 1% of the entire state of California is now in a drought situation, according the the U.S. Drought Monitor website.

Just compare the previous first weeks of March:

California maps here: https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/CurrentMap/StateDroughtMonitor.aspx?CA

Of course, we’ll still have shrill fools that will screech “climate change!” the next time the soil gets a bit dry, but for those people, there’s this lesson in California climate history:

From 2014, spot the portion caused by “man-made climate change”:

California_drought_timeline