Advanced Mexico-US Drug Tunnel had Solar Panels, Ventilation, & Rail System

By Katherine Lam | Fox News – Re-Blogged From Fox News

Authorities uncovered a tunnel outfitted with solar panels, lighting, ventilation and a rail system that could carry illegal immigrants, arms dealers and drug smugglers from Mexico into the United States, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said this week.

Authorities made the discovery in mid-September and said the tunnel’s entrance, in Baja California, Mexico, was just 221 feet south of the U.S. border. The entry shaft was about 31 feet deep.

Continue reading

Advertisements

A Once Mighty Nation Is In The Process Of A Complete And Total Societal Meltdown

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

What would the United States look like right now if 113 political figures had been gunned down since last September?  Well, that is precisely what has happened in Mexico.

Once upon a time, Mexico had a thriving economy and a very stable government, but now the nation is devolving into a Mad Max society in which the drug cartels gun down any politicians that they do not like.

Continue reading

Self-Harm, Suicide Attempts Climb Among US Girls

Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Attempted suicides, drug overdoses, cutting and other types of self-injury have increased substantially in U.S. girls, a 15-year study of emergency room visits found.

It’s unclear why, but some mental health experts think cyberbullying, substance abuse and economic stress from the recent recession might be contributing.

The rising rates “should be of concern to parents, teachers, and pediatricians. One important reason to focus on reducing self-harm is that it is key risk factor for suicide,” said Dr. Mark Olfson, a Columbia University psychiatry professor who was not involved in the study.

Continue reading

A Better Solution Than Trump’s Border Wall

By Ron Paul – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

Just one week in office, President Trump is already following through on his pledge to address illegal immigration. His January 25th executive order called for the construction of a wall along the entire length of the US-Mexico border. While he is right to focus on the issue, there are several reasons why his proposed solution will unfortunately not lead us anywhere closer to solving the problem.

First, the wall will not work. Texas already started building a border fence about ten years ago. It divided people from their own property across the border, it deprived people of their land through the use of eminent domain, and in the end the problem of drug and human smuggling was not solved.

Second, the wall will be expensive. The wall is estimated to cost between 12 and 15 billion dollars. You can bet it will be more than that. President Trump has claimed that if the Mexican government doesn’t pay for it, he will impose a 20 percent duty on products imported from Mexico. Who will pay this tax? Ultimately, the American consumer, as the additional costs will be passed on. This will, of course, hurt the poorest Americans the most.

Continue reading

Beyond Permissionless Innovation

By Veronique de Rugy – Re-Blogged From Reason.com

Exciting things happen outside the reach of regulators.

Paul McCarthy is the father of a boy born without fingers on one hand. A few years ago, McCarthy found that a $30,000 prosthesis—the only option then available—was not a perfect match for his 12-year-old son’s needs, so he went online to find a better, less pricey alternative. McCarthy’s search led to the assembly of an unlikely team: a South African woodworker, an American puppeteer, and another father in a similar situation. Thanks to the power of the Internet, the men were able to collaborate from thousands of miles apart to make an inexpensive but workable prosthetic appendage using 3D printers.

Such “permissionless” innovation, in which people with big ideas for how to make the world better act on them without first jumping through regulatory hoops, is remarkable. It’s also extremely fragile. The entire enterprise could crumble overnight with a stroke of a regulator’s pen, a change in an insurance company’s policy, or a lawsuit filed by entrenched manufacturing interests. It hasn’t so far in this case. But due to pressure from competitors that make traditional prosthetics, the company McCarthy and his partners created has already had to agree to define its product as a “training” prosthetic, thus opening the door to future regulatory limitations on its business model.

Consider how the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in the name of safety at any cost, quashed the genomics company 23andMe by ordering it to stop marketing its cheap, at-home genetic testing kits. According to the agency, 23andMe should have obtained permission from regulators before selling its product to American consumers who were interested in learning more about their own personal genetic information.