Plans for a Global Dystopia

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From GoldMoney

Global policy planners intend to deliver replacements for both dollar hegemony and fossil fuels. Plans may appear uncoordinated and in their early stages, but these issues are becoming increasingly linked.

A monetary reset incorporating state-sponsored cryptocurrencies will enable exchange controls to be introduced between nations by separating cross-border trade payments from domestic money circulation. The purpose will be to gain greater control over money and to direct its investment into green projects.

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Global Industrial Slump And Brexit Dance Go On

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The Brexit saga continues. Both the U.S. and China’s industrial sectors suffer from the trade war. How will the Fed react to these downside risks tomorrow? The expectation is that it’ll cut rates, but will that really happen? And how will gold take to that?

Brexit Dance Goes On

Last week, we wrote about the Brexit saga, diving into the latest battles between Johnson and Parliament. But the drama has not ended yet. As we concluded one week ago, “Brexit is far from over, and British politics may surprise us again.” Indeed, Johnson wanted to call a snap general election in December to gain more leverage in the House of Commons, but the UK parliament has rejected Johnson’s proposal. For the third time. But Boris does not like losing, so he proposed today a new bill that lowers the number of MPs requires to pass the decision to hold an early election from two thirds to simple majority.

In the meantime, the EU agreed to the Brexit extension until the end of January 2020. Importantly, the EU offered a “flextension,” which means that the UK could leave before the deadline if a deal is approved by the British Parliament. Brexit is still far from concluded and snap elections could significantly change the political landscape. But one thing is sure for now, the possibility of a non-deal Brexit has been postponed until January 31, 2020 at least. This should reduce the safe-haven demand for gold, but also support the pound and euro against the U.S. dollar, gold’s nemesis.

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China or US?

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Money

China has made some silly errors in its conflict with the US, reflecting the arrogance that often afflicts every state actor. But the appearance that China is being backed into a corner over Huawei, trade tariffs and Hong Kong is misleading. China is progressing her own plans, and they do not require an accommodation with America. With Russia in tow, she is now the chief foreign influencer for up to three-quarters of the world’s population, so it is American hegemony that’s being backed into a corner.  One day, this will be reflected in a currency shoot-out. This article concludes that the dollar is more at risk than the yuan, the opposite of perceptions in western capital markets.

Introduction

In the undeclared war between the US and China, the focus has been on the obvious battles. Huawei has been badly wounded but looks like surviving. The trade tariff battle continues and the battle in Hong Kong is ongoing and yet to be resolved.

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Is Your Freight Prepared for Brexit?

By Alina Grace of Haulystic Innovations

Aren’t you getting frustrated listening to different scenarios about Brexit every day? Brexit is around the corner and we still do not have a clear picture on what is going to happen to UK and the world after the 31ST of October, 2019. Logistics is an industry that has adapted to economic and political changes throughout the years.

So, why do we worry about Brexit?

Is the fact that United Kingdom will leave the EU, with or without a deal, so important that will change the landscape of the global supply chain services forever?

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Casting Off The EU Millstone

Introduction

It should have been no surprise that Boris Johnson is now Prime Minister. It should also be no surprise he will implement Brexit on 31 October, the last date agreed between Mrs May’s government and the EU. Johnson was elected by Conservative constituency members to do just that. His cabinet appointees are fully supportive, including ex-Remainers (that’s politics!) and he has appointed an aggressive rottweiler, Dominic Cummings, as his Brexit enforcer. Already, his influence over Brexit strategy can be detected. There are no compromises to be had, a point which slower minds in the commentariat find difficult to comprehend and accept.

It is likely there will be an agreement on the way forward after Brexit, which could involve a transition period, but nothing like that agreed with Mrs May. If, as seems unlikely, the EU digs its heels in, the UK will walk away. That is the message being given by the new administration.

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Europe Circumvents U.S. Sanctions On Iran

By Frances Coppota – Re-Blogged From Forbes

Europe has found a way of circumventing U.S. sanctions on Iran. The governments of France, Germany and the United Kingdom have developed a special purpose vehicle (SPV) to enable European businesses to maintain non-dollar trade with Iran without breaking U.S. sanctions. That SPV, known as INSTEX, is now up and running.

The three governments announced the successful implementation of INSTEX at a meeting of the Joint Commission of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) on June 28, 2019. The meeting was chaired on behalf of the EU by the Secretary General of the European External Action Service (EEAS), Helga Schmid, and was attended by representatives of China, France, Germany, Russia, the United Kingdom, and Iran.

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Europe’s Hail Mary Pass

By Rick Ackerman – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Europe took competition to a new level last week in the global currency-devaluation olympiad. Nominating the politically-minded IMF chief Christine Lagarde rather than a blue-blooded financier to run the ECB is akin to making Trump chairman of the Federal Reserve. No longer can we pretend that the staid protocols of old-school banking still obtain in the financial realm. Instead, there is a strong whiff of desperation as Europe readies a last-ditch attempt to stimulate itself out of a liquidity trap with the ECB’s deposit rate already at minus 0.4%.

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