Buffett Spends $928 Million to Buy His Own Shares Back

[This may be one of the very few stock buybacks to make sense for stockholders – because company profits are growing quickly and other opportunities are hard to find. -Bob]

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Warren Buffett’s company more than quadrupled its third-quarter profits because of a huge paper gain in the value of its investments, although its insurance and railroad businesses also improved.

Notably, Buffett’s company bought back nearly $1 billion in stock during the quarter — the first time that’s happened in years — a possible sign that the world’s most famous investor has been unable to find attractive investments to purchase.

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Kudlow: Market Worried Democrats Will Overturn Trump Growth Policies

By F McGuire – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow says that Wall Street is plunging because of fear Democrats will win midterms and end President Donald Trump’s “pro-growth policies.”

Kudlow, speaking to reporters outside the White House on Tuesday, blamed the market decline on mid-term elections, CNBC.com reported.

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Fed Turns More Hawkish

By Arkadiusz Sieron– Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Powell and Co. hiked again. And the FOMC removed the important phrase about “accommodative” stance. What now for gold?

Yesterday, the FOMC published the monetary policy statement from its latest meeting that took place on September 25-26. In line with the expectations, the US central bank raised the federal funds rate by 25 basis points to the target range of 2 to 2.25 percent:

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Big Debt-Fueled GDP Number For The 2nd Quarter

By Michael Snyder – Re-Blogged From Freedom Outpost

What kind of number for GDP growth in the 2nd quarter will we get on Friday? The market consensus is somewhere around 4 percent, but there are many out there that are expecting a number above 5 percent. The last time we witnessed such a number was during the third quarter of 2014 when the U.S. economy grew by 5.2 percent. If Friday’s GDP figure is better than that, it will be the best report that we have had since 2003. But let’s keep things in perspective. In seven of the last 10 years, GDP growth was much lower than anticipated in the first quarter and much higher than anticipated in the second quarter. It looks like that pattern may play out again in 2018, and analysts are already warning us to expect a much lower number for the third quarter.

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Global Investment in Renewable Energy Has Stalled

By Steve Goreham – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Earlier this month, the Trump Administration announced a decision to apply a 30 percent tariff on imported solar cells and panels. The Solar Industries Association denounced the measure, projecting job losses and cancellation of solar investments. But the solar tariff discussion hides a larger renewable energy issue. Global investment in renewables has stalled in the US, in Europe, and in many markets across the world.

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What Everyone Is Missing About The US Tax Cuts

By Steve Saville – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The changes to US taxes that were approved late last year have drawn acclaim and criticism, but in most cases both those who view the tax changes positively and those who view the tax changes negatively are missing two important points.

Most criticism of the tax changes boils down to one of three issues. The first is that the tax cuts favour the rich. This is true, but any meaningful tax cut will have to favour the people who pay most of the tax. Furthermore, contrary to the Keynesian belief system a tax cut will bring about the greatest long-term benefit to the overall economy if it favours people who are more likely to save/invest the additional income over people who are more likely to immediately spend the additional income on consumer items.

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Deflation Must Be Embraced

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

There are two problems with understanding deflation: it is ill defined, and it has a bad name. This article puts deflation into its proper context. This is an important topic for advocates of gold as money, who will be aware that sound money, in theory, leads to lower prices over time and is often criticised as an objective, because it is not an inflationary stimulation.

The simplest definition for deflation is that it is when the quantity of money contracts. This can come about in one or more of three ways. The central bank may reduce the quantity of base money, commercial banks may reduce the amount of bank credit, or foreigners, in possession of your currency from an imbalance of trade, sell it to the central bank.

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