Magic Money Tree Economics

By GE Christenson – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

Our Current Financial Circumstances

  1. The U.S. is $22 trillion in debt and burdened with $100 – $200 trillion more in unfunded liabilities. Just to pay the interest the U.S. must borrow. Debt is rapidly rising and cannot be paid unless “they” default or hyper-inflate the dollar.
  2. Chairman Jerome Powell stated, “The U.S. federal government is on an unsustainable path.” Even the Fed admits what everyone should realize.
  3. Global debt is $250 trillion. Some countries have descended farther down the debt-paved road to economic hell than the U.S.
  4. Pensions are under-funded, student debt is a disaster, the main street economy is weak, real estate prices and sales are falling, retail sales are down, real wages have been stagnant since the 1970s, and no credible plan exists to fix debt, deficits or devaluations.
  5. The political and financial elite profit from wars, inflation, devaluation, strip-mining assets, and income inequality.
  6. It’s an ugly picture with no easy answers. But debt, deficits and QE levitated stock markets to all-time highs.

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Low Oil Price Guts Another OPEC Oil Exporter

By SRSrocco – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The low oil price is negatively impacting another OPEC oil exporter as it continues to liquidate its foreign exchange reserves.  Algeria, like Saudi Arabia, has seen its international reserves plummet by more than 40% as the oil price fell in half since 2014.

Algeria joined OPEC back in 1969 and is currently producing 1.1 million barrels of oil per day (mbd).  While Algeria is not one of the larger OPEC members, it still exports roughly 670,000 barrels of oil per day.  At $50 a barrel, the country receives $33.5 million a day in oil revenues.  However, Algeria’s oil revenues have taken a nose-dive as the oil price declined from over $100 in 2014 to below $50 currently:

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Dream Of The Central Banker

By Mark O’Byrne – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The art world and artists have in the main not addressed one of the most important issues of our time – central banks foisting debt on the people and nations of the world and thereby controlling them.

An artist who has the knowledge and courage to look at and address the world of money, the dangers of monetary policies today and currency debasement on a scale that the world has never seen before is an Irish artist called Conor Walton.

The Dream of the Central Banker (Click painting to enlarge)

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Jim Rickards Interview

By Tekoa de Silva – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Following a recent keynote presentation at the Sprott Natural Resource Symposium, James G. Rickards, best-selling author and advisor to the US Department of Defense and Intelligence Communities, was kind enough to share a few comments with the Sprott’s Thoughts publication.

It was a fascinating conversation, as Jim noted the world’s monetary structures resemble, “Two tectonic plates; there’s the natural tectonic plate—deflation—and then…the policy plate of inflation—which is money printing, currency wars, QE, operation twist, negative interest rates, and zero interest rates…”

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Four Stages Of Monetary Madness

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

There are four stages of fiat money printing that have been used by central banks throughout their horrific history of usurping the market-based value of money and borrowing costs. It is a destructive path that began with going off the gold standard and historically ends in hyperinflation and economic chaos.

Stage one is the most benign of the four, but it sets the stage for the baneful effects of the remaining three. The first level of monetary credit creation uses the central banks’ artificial savings to set short-term interest rates through the buying and selling of short-duration government debt. This stage appears innocuous to most at first but is insidiously destructive because it prevents the market from determining the cost of money. This is crucially important because all assets are priced off of the so called “risk-free” rate of return. A gold standard keeps the monetary base from rising more than a few percentage points per annum and thus restrains bank lending. However, having a fiat currency also means a nation has a fiat monetary base. This leads to unfettered bank lending and the creation of asset bubbles.

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Japan’s “Helicopter Money” Play: Road To Hyperinflation Or Cure For Debt Deflation?

[I DO NOT agree with the Helicopter Money thesis. Governments’ expansions of their money supplies unrestrictedly were the cause of every Hyperinflation the world has known, as for example in Wiemar Germany and more recently in Zimbabwe. –Bob]

By Ellen Brown – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

Fifteen years after embarking on its largely ineffective quantitative easing program, Japan appears poised to try the form recommended by Ben Bernanke in his notorious “helicopter money” speech in 2002. The Japanese test case could finally resolve a longstanding dispute between monetarists and money reformers over the economic effects of government-issued money.

When then-Fed Governor Ben Bernanke gave his famous helicopter money speech to the Japanese in 2002, he was talking about something quite different from the quantitative easing they actually got and other central banks later mimicked. Quoting Milton Friedman, he said the government could reverse a deflation simply by printing money and dropping it from helicopters. A gift of free money with no strings attached, it would find its way into the real economy and trigger the demand needed to power productivity and employment.

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