What Happens When Google Disagree With You?

By James Damore – Re-Blogged From Prager University

CONTINUE READING –>

Advertisements

Survey Reveals Just How Many Americans Think Political Correctness Is ‘A Big Problem’

By Tre Goins-Phillips – Re-Blogged From Independent Journal Review

A recently released survey reveals the majority of Americans believe political correctness is “a big problem” in the United States.

According to the Cato Institute’s new study — “The State of Free Speech and Tolerance in America” — 70 percent of Americans agreed with the following statement: “A big problem this country has is being politically correct.”

In addition, 71 percent of Americans believe political correctness has only served to “silence important discussions” our society needs to have. And a staggering 58 percent of Americans said today’s political climate leads them to self-censor their opinions and beliefs.

Only 28 percent of respondents believe political correctness “has done more to help people avoid offending others.”

While, per Cato, liberals are “more likely than conservatives” to see a variety of political opinions as “offensive or hateful,” they also feel more comfortable sharing their own views:

Democrats (53%) are more likely than Republicans (26%) and independents (39%) to feel they can express their opinions. […] Nearly three-fourths (73%) of Republicans and 58% of independents are afraid to share some of their true beliefs because of the political climate.

Cato rightly suggested the discrepancy could be due to the fact that, ultimately, “cultural sources of power, such as media, academia, and entertainment, may matter more” than which party — Republican or Democratic — occupies the White House.

Regardless, President Donald Trump certainly tapped into a growing concern among a majority of Americans. On the campaign trail in 2016, then-candidate Trump said, “I think the big problem this country has is being politically correct.”

CONTINUE READING –>

Gold Coin Dilemma, Politics and Nonsense

By Gary Christenson – Re-Blogged From Sprott Money

There are five identical bags of gold, and each contains ten gold coins. However, one of the five bags contains fake gold. The real gold, fake gold, and five bags appear identical, except the coins of fake gold each weigh 1.1 ounces, and the real gold coins each weigh 1 ounce. You have an accurate digital scale and CAN USE IT ONLY ONCE.

How do you determine which bag contains the fake gold?

(Thanks to my friend Brian C. for sending me this dilemma.)

There is a straight-forward answer to this question, but let’s speculate on what happens when we involve politics and prejudice.

The Gold Coin Dilemma, Politics and Nonsense - Gary Christenson

Is The Yellen Fed Planning To Sabotage Trump’s Presidency?

By Stefan Gleason – Re-Blogged From http://www.Silver-Phoenix500.com

The Federal Reserve can make or break a president.

Monetary policy influences all financial markets as well as the cycles in the economy. No president wants to have to run for re-election when the stock market and economy are turning down.

Recall that President George H.W. Bush was sitting on sky-high job approval numbers in 1991 and was expected to coast to victory in his 1992 re-election bid. But then the economy swooned toward recession, giving Bill Clinton the opening he needed.

Continue reading

2017 Third-Quarter World Forecast

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Overview

Tempering Trump Policy: Ongoing federal investigations and intensifying budget battles with Congress will make for another distracting quarter for U.S. President Donald Trump. But these disruptions won’t mitigate the rhetoric of White House ideologues, or broader speculation that the United States is retreating from the global stage. The reality of the superpower’s role in global governance, of course, is far more complicated. Meanwhile, the administration’s more extreme policy initiatives, particularly on matters of trade and climate, will be tempered at the federal, corporate, state and local levels. And though the United States will maintain its security alliances abroad, it will also generate enough uncertainty to drive its partners toward unilateral action in managing their own neighborhoods.

Sparks Fly in the Middle East: Qatar’s standoff with Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates will persist throughout the quarter amid intensifying battles among regional powers’ proxies across the region. More visible competition within the Gulf Cooperation Council and growing distrust between Turkey and its Gulf neighbors will reveal the weaknesses of the White House’s strategy to conform to Riyadh’s increasingly assertive foreign policy in an attempt to manage the region. The risk of clashes among great powers is also on the rise in eastern Syria: As Iran works to create a land bridge from Tehran to Damascus and the Mediterranean coast, Syrian loyalists and U.S.-backed rebels are racing toward the Iraqi border, all while Russia uses the Syrian battlefield to jockey with the United States for influence.

A Stressed but Stable Oil Market: As Saudi Arabia’s young Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman continues to amass power, much of his focus will stay fixed on preparing for the initial public offering of Saudi Aramco in 2018. Part of that plan entails preserving a deal on production cuts among major oil producers in hopes of keeping prices stable amid climbing output in the United States, Libya, Nigeria and Kazakhstan. Compliance with the agreement will hold through the quarter, but it will slip toward the end of the year as signatories begin to craft their exit strategies.

Dancing Around the North Korean Crisis: The limits to China’s cooperation in sanctions against North Korea will become clearer as trade talks between Beijing and Washington head for a rough patch. Pyongyang’s nuclear and weapons tests will continue to fuel friction in the region, though they will not increase the chances of U.S. military action this quarter unless the North Korean regime can demonstrate a credible long-range missile capability; an achievement that is probably still at least a year away.

Europe Buys Time While Russia Airs Its Dirty Laundry: A likely electoral win for Germany’s moderate forces and early reform successes in France will reinvigorate calls to take advantage of the prevailing calm on the Continent to revamp the European Union. Doing so, however, will expose the many fault lines festering in Europe as each camp proposes a different vision for integration. And with a wary West on guard against Russian cyberwarfare and propaganda campaigns, there will be little room for substantive negotiation between Washington and Moscow this quarter. At the same time, a burgeoning protest movement will keep the Kremlin’s hands full at home.
CONTINUE READING –>

P.M. Modi and India’s Future

Re-Blogged From http://www.Stratfor.com

It can be difficult to separate the important from unimportant on any given day. Reflections mean to do exactly that — by thinking about what happened today, we can consider what might happen tomorrow.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration has struggled to make headway on many of its signature initiatives in the face of India’s manifold political constraints. Job growth, a core plank of the 2014 campaign platform on which Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) rose to power, is tepid. Relations with Pakistan, India’s traditional archrival, are on the rocks as protests, cease-fire violations and cross-border militant attacks endure in the disputed territory of Kashmir. And “Make in India,” Modi’s vaunted initiative to transform his country into a global manufacturing hub, has had a hard time landing lucrative deals (outside of defense contracts) since its inception in September 2014.

Continue reading

How Constitutional Corruption Has Led to Ideological Litmus Tests for Judicial Nominees

By Roger Pilon – Re-Blogged From The Cato Institute

The 2000 presidential election was widely understood to be a battle for the courts. When George W. Bush finally won, following the Supreme Court’s split decision in Bush v. Gore, many Democratic activists simply dug in their heels, vowing to frustrate Bush’s efforts to fill vacancies on the federal courts. After Democrats took control of the Senate in May of 2001, they began calling explicitly for ideological litmus tests for judicial nominees. And they started a confirmation stall, especially for circuit court nominees, that continues to this day. Thus, 8 of Bush’s first 11 circuit court nominees went for over a year without even a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, and most have still not come before the committee.

Continue reading