It’s Been A Great Recession For A Few

By David Haggith – Re-Blogged From Silver Phoenix

This month the economic expansion brought to you by your Federal Reserve and by US government largess becomes the longest expansion in the history of the United States! That’s something, right? Something? Let’s take an honest look at what we now call great.

By “the longest expansion” we mean the longest period in which US GDP has been growing without a recession. Now, that’s something to crow about, right?

Not so fast for many reasons. It’s also been the most anemic expansion on the books, and it’s not too hard to see why it’s been the longest, having nothing at all to do with a great economy. It has cost us far more than any expansion (by an order of magnitude) because we’ve piled up ten times the national debt over any amount we accumulated during previous expansions. (I’ve said before, it’s easy to let the “good times” roll when you are buying it all on the company credit card.) We also quadrupled the size of the Fed’s balance sheet. That didn’t cost anything, but we sure didn’t get much bang for the buck! We actually got less bang than in any previous expansion!

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Will Fed Easing Turn Out Like ’95 Or ‘07?

By Michael Pento – Re-Blogged From PentoPort

You should completely understand that the market is dangerously overvalued and that global economic growth has slowed to a crawl along with S&P 500 earnings. However, you must also be wondering when the massive overhang of unprecedented debt levels, artificial market manipulations, and the anemic economy will finally shock Wall Street to a brutal reality.

Artificially-low bond yields are prolonging the life of this terminally-ill market. In fact, record-low borrowing costs have been the lynchpin for perpetuating the illusion. Therefore, what will finally pull the plug on this market’s life support system is spiking corporate bond yields, which will manifest from the bursting of the $5.4 trillion BBB, Junk bond and leveraged loan markets. And, for that to occur, you will first need an outright US recession and/or a bonafide inflation scare.

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Broken Markets And Fragile Currencies

By Alasdair Macleod – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

There are growing signs that the global economic slowdown is for real. As was the case in 1929, the combination of the peak of the credit cycle coupled with trade protectionism in the Smoot-Hawley Tariff Act are similar conditions to those of today and potentially pose a serious economic challenge to the post-Bretton Woods fiat currency system. Therefore, we must consider the consequences if monetary policy fails to contain the developing recession and it turns into a full-blown slump. Complacency over broken markets is no longer an option, with rising prices for gold and bitcoin signalling the prospect of a new round of currency debasement to avoid market distortions unwinding. This article shows why this outcome could undermine fiat currencies entirely and looks at the alternatives of bitcoin and gold in this context.

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Gold Summer Doldrums

By Adam Hamilton – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Gold’s incredible strength this summer is very unusual, as early summers are the weakest times of the year seasonally for gold, silver, and their miners’ stocks.  With traders’ attention diverted to vacations and summer fun, interest in and demand for precious metals normally wane.  So this entire sector tends to suffer a seasonal lull, along with the general markets.  This June’s bull-market breakout is a momentous anomaly.

This doldrums term is very apt for gold’s usual summer predicament.  It describes a zone in the world’s oceans surrounding the equator.  There hot air is constantly rising, creating long-lived low-pressure areas.  They are often calm, with little or no prevailing winds.  History is full of accounts of sailing ships getting trapped in this zone for days or weeks, unable to make headway.  The doldrums were murder on ships’ morale.

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A Look At Futures Contracts

Mark J Lundeen – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

Every bull market advance eventually sees its last all-time high. No one rings a bell when it happens, but from that point on things begin to change for the worse for the bulls.

The Dow Jones’ BEV chart below begins at the -54% bear-market bottom of the 2007-09 credit crisis. We don’t see a -54% BEV value as I began this series on the March 09, 2009 bear-market bottom. So instead we see a 0.00%, as the first data point of all BEV series begins at zero percent.

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Best-Case Scenario Has a Worst-Case Twist

So, I did say my “worst-case scenario” did not seem like the most likely scenario to play out from the G-20 summit. Now we know my “best-case scenario” and most likely scenario is the one Trump and Xi have chosen, but what does that mean for the month of July?

Here was the best-case scenario

Xi and Trump agree to come out of their meeting sounding like there is hope for a future agreement soon (albeit with nothing specific that has been agreed upon). We all know there is no chance they come out with a deal. So, the best hope is they come out with Trump talking (again) like a deal is imminent and, therefore, he’ll hold off on his tariff increases a little longer. The market feels relief and breaks resoundingly through its eighteen-month ceiling. The remaining indices that have not cleared through their upper barrier manage also to poke through to a new high and manage to hold … for a little while.

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Safe Haven Demand As Rising Risks

Gold surged over $1,436/oz this morning, it’s highest level in almost six years as an escalation of US sanctions on Iran added to heightened geopolitical uncertainty and uncertainty in global markets.

Market participants are also concerned about the G-20 summit this weekend where it is hoped that President Donald Trump and China’s Premier Xi Jinping will meet to discuss the deepening trade war.
Gold has closed above $1400 for first time since 2013 as investors diversify into safe haven gold to hedge the growing global risks including the risk of much looser monetary policies again and of zero percent and negative interest rates.

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