Stanford Engineers Develop New Air Filter That Could Help Beijing Residents Breathe Easily

By Bjorn Carey – Re-Blogged From http://news.stanford.edu

Stanford’s Yi Cui and his students have turned a material commonly used in surgical gloves into a low-cost, highly efficient air filter. It could be used to improve facemasks and window screens, and maybe even scrub the exhaust from power plants.

Video by Kurt Hickman

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A Robot Just Performed the First-Ever Surgery Inside the Human Eye

Re-Blogged From https://futurism.com

A new retinal surgery, guided by human surgeons but performed by robots, has just passed clinical trials. Robots bring much more control to delicate surgeries than can be achieved by humans alone. Soon, surgical robots will enable surgeons to perform entirely new operations which the human hand, until now, has been too clumsy to accomplish.

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New Dialysis-Style Treatment ‘Washes’ Blood of Cancer Cells

By June Javelosa – Re-Blogged From https://futurism.com

In Brief

A significant milestone in cancer research sees the development of a new system that can dramatically pull down the cost of cancer treatment and reduce risk of cancer spreading by cleaning cancer from the blood.

Milestone

A team of researchers from the University of New South Wales (NSW) have developed a new system that can potentially lower the cost of cancer treatment using biochip filters that identify and remove cancer cells. The team refers to the process as “dialysis for cancer.”

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New Infrared-Emitting Device Could Allow Energy Harvesting From Waste Heat

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Researchers create first MEMS metamaterial device that displays infrared patterns that can be quickly changed

THE OPTICAL SOCIETY

WASHINGTON — A new reconfigurable device that emits patterns of thermal infrared light in a fully controllable manner could one day make it possible to collect waste heat at infrared wavelengths and turn it into usable energy.

The new technology could be used to improve thermophotovoltaics, a type of solar cell that uses infrared light, or heat, rather than the visible light absorbed by traditional solar cells. Scientists have been working to create thermophotovoltaics that are practical enough to harvest the heat energy found in hot areas, such as around furnaces and kilns used by the glass industry. They could also be used to turn heat coming from vehicle engines into energy to charge a car battery, for example.

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Oil – Will we run out?

By Andy May – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

“Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future” (old Danish proverb, sometimes attributed to Niels Bohr or Yogi Berra)

In November, 2016 the USGS (United States Geological Survey) reported their assessment of the recent discovery of 20 billion barrels of oil equivalent (technically recoverable) in the Midland Basin of West Texas. About the same time IHS researcher Peter Blomquist published an estimate of 35 billion barrels. Compare these estimates with Ghawar Field in Saudi Arabia, the largest conventional oil field in the world, which contained 80 billion barrels when discovered. There is an old saying in the oil and gas exploration business “big discoveries get bigger and small discoveries get smaller.” As a retired petrophysicist who has been involved with many discoveries of all sizes, I can say this is what I’ve always seen, although I have no statistics to back the statement up. Twenty or thirty years from now when the field is mostly developed, it is very likely the estimated ultimate hydrocarbon recovery from the field will be larger than either of those estimates.

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Exacerbating the Business Cycle

cropped-bob-shapiro.jpg   By Bob Shapiro

I recommend a recent article to you, “The Origin of Cycles,” by Alasdair Macleod. The author describes several characteristics of business cycles and some causes. It is well worth reading. I would like to add to his presentation.

Business Cycles have been identified for several hundred years. Adam Smith in his The Wealth of Nations (241 years go!) discussed the Pig Cycle. Farmers noticing that then current prices supported a nice profit over current costs, expanded their herds. But then the expanded supply some time later caused pig prices to fall, which encouraged some pig farmers to reduce their herds. Reduced future supply raised prices allowing the cycle to repeat every 3-5 years.

Image result for pigs

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China Sets The Stage To Replace The US As Global Trade Leader

By Frank Holmes – Re-Blogged From http://www.Gold-Eagle.com

Saturday marked the Lunar New Year, the most important date in the Chinese calendar. It’s also the start of the longest holiday at two weeks, during which the largest mass migration of humans occurs every year as families reunite and go on vacations, both domestic and overseas.

2017 is the year of the 10th Chinese zodiac, the fire rooster, one of whose lucky colors is gold. Year-to-date, gold—the metal, not the color—is up 3.5 percent, which is below the 5.7 percent it had gained so far around this time last year. Unfortunately, gold prices won’t find support from Chinese traders this week, as markets will be closed in observance of the new year. If you remember, the yellow metal had one of its worst one-day slumps of 2016 back in October during China’s Golden Week, when markets were similarly closed.

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