Doctors Are Preparing to Implant the World’s First Human Bionic Eye

Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism

The same implants could potentially treat paralysis as well.

A team of researchers at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, has built a bionic device that they say can restore vision to the blind through a brain implant.

The team is now preparing for what they claim will be the world’s first human clinical trials of a bionic eye — and are asking for additional funding to eventually manufacture it on a global scale.

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Engineers Test Jetliner Where You Ride in the Wings

We Have Liftoff

For the first time, a scale model of the Flying-V, an experimental jetliner that seats passengers inside its wings, took flight during an uncrewed test.

The results of a Flying-V test have been long awaited. The plane’s unusual design makes it 20 percent more fuel efficient than the most advanced planes on the market, according to New Atlas, which has covered the project previously. But, as with any unusual experimental design, it remains unclear how well it would actually work in practice.

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Wearable Air Conditioner Could Stave Off Your Death In This Heat Wave

Personal Cooldown

Sony has developed a wearable personal air conditioner that you can stick inside a specially-designed pocket sewn into an accompanying shirt.

The device was meant to cool down attendants of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, but the event had to be postponed due to the coronavirus. But summer itself isn’t cancelled — with much of North America slammed by a July heat wave — so luckily Sony decided to make the futuristic device available for purchase anyway.

Restaurants Are in Need of a Helping Hand. Miso Robotics Is Offering Them One. Literally.

By Rachelle Dragani – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Flippy the robot flips cooks burgers to perfection.

Dining out looks pretty different these days. It’s natural to pine for the past, but many quick service restauranteurs are also looking ahead to a future where automation will be the key to drastically increasing their notoriously thin margins and allowing their workers to shine in the tasks no machine can do.

Robots in the workplace can get a bad rap—most people aren’t trying to get replaced by one. But the smartest and most innovative robotic companies aren’t designing teams of droids that send people packing. Instead, they’re crafting intelligent machines that work alongside workers, increasing efficiency and profits in the process.

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Claim: “Bath Sponge” Metal Organic Material Makes Climate Friendly Hydrogen Automobiles Viable

Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster
Last time someone tried to create a Hydrogen economy – the Hindenburg Hydrogen Explosion Disaster – By Gus Pasquerella – http://www.lakehurst.navy.mil/nlweb/images/1213d.gif, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=632191

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Struggling U.S. Dairy Farmers Fight to Survive

By Associated Press- Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

At Rosendale Dairy, each of the 9,000 cows has a microchip implanted in an ear that workers can scan with smartphones for up-to-the-minute information on how the animal is doing — everything from their nutrition to their health history to their productivity. Feed is calibrated to deliver a precise diet and machines handle the milking. In the fields, drones gather data that helps bump up yields for the row crops grown to feed the animals.

Technology has played an important role in agriculture for years but it’s become a life and death matter at dairy farms these days, as low milk prices have ratcheted up pressure on farmers to seek every possible efficiency to avoid joining the thousands of operations that have failed.

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Panasonic’s VR Glasses Are Unlike Any You’ve Seen Before

Steampunk VR

Virtual reality headsets might soon become far less cumbersome.

At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Japanese electronics corporation Panasonic showed off a VR glasses prototype that looks like something out of a 90s steampunk movie, The Verge reports.

The glasses feature some impressive specs: high resolution micro OLED panels for each eye and support for HDR— high dynamic range technology that’s usually limited to monitors and TVs. In a statement, Panasonic claims the glasses are the world’s first HDR-enabled VR unit.

This Clever Car Add-On Uses AI to Block Out Just The Sun

Sun Blind

German engineering company Bosch has come up with a clever new automotive sun visor that uses an LCD panel and artificial intelligence to block out only the Sun in the driver’s vision.

The idea is to give them an unobstructed view of the road ahead when the sun is low in the sky. Each year, thousands of car accidents are related to sun glare, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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Here’s How an Iranian Cyberattack Could Affect You

By Kristin Houser

The nation could attempt to take out American power grids — but probably won’t.

Almost immediately after the United States killed Iran’s top military general Qassim Suleimani, the Middle Eastern nation vowed to carry out “crushing revenge” for the slaying.

The internet took that to mean World War III was imminent — but it might not be a physical battle that the average American needs to worry about so much as a cyber one.

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How Watching TV Will Change in the 2020s

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

What will watching TV be like in the 2020s? Amid new gadgets and glitz, the CES tech show in Las Vegas aims to offer some answers, many of which boil down to more streaming and more efforts to glue you to your phone.

The show’s keynote addresses, once dominated by computer and chip makers, will this year feature executives from TV networks NBC and CBS and upstart video services like mobile-focused Quibi and free streamer Tubi. Topic one will be the streaming wars — not to mention mounting costs for consumers who want access to everything — as giants NBC Universal and WarnerMedia prepare to join the clash with Netflix later this year.

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The Elderly in Japan are Using Exoskeletons to Delay Retirement

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism
“The father is in his 70s and was supposed to retire but is still working with our muscle suit.”

Exoskeletons aren’t just for super soldiers, automotive assembly workers and the paralyzed — they can assist the elderly in everyday tasks as well.

Now, New Scientist reports that older folks in Japan are using exoskeletons to help them do their jobs as they spend more of their lives in the workforce.

Japan currently has one of the oldest populations int he world. According to the U.S. Population Reference Bureau, Japan has the highest share of people above the age of 65 of any country — 26 percent, according to 2015 data.

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New Way to Remove Carbon Dioxide from Air

By Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The process could work on the gas at any concentrations, from power plant emissions to open air

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

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Air Force New Laser Cannon

The U.S. Air Force finally has its hands on the laser cannon that military tech contractor Raytheon built for it.

The laser weapon, which can be mounted onto the back of a vehicle, is designed to help the Air Force take down hostile drones, Engadget reports. While the military will spend another year testing the cannon, the delivery represents an escalation in the arms race as more countries work to develop dangerous lasers.

Trial Period

The Air Force will test out the cannon in real-world scenarios overseas for the next year, though it’s not clear how that’s distinct from active deployment.

Nanoparticle Tech Reduces Celiac Disease Symptoms by 90%

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Let them eat cake. And bread. And…

People with celiac disease have two options in life, neither of which is ideal.

Because their immune systems can’t tolerate gluten, they can choose to never eat the many delicious foods containing it. Boring.

Or they can devour all the cake, bread, and beer they want — but resign themselves to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other nasty side effects when their immune systems trigger an inflammation response in their small intestines.

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Quantum Supremacy

Rumors have been circulating for weeks that tech megacorporation Google has achieved quantum supremacy, meaning it’s used an experimental quantum computer to perform a calculation significantly faster than a regular binary computer.

In a mysterious paper spotted by the Financial Times on NASA’s Technical Reports Server in September, Google researchers claimed to have beaten a supercomputer by a wide margin. But the paper was quickly deleted, prompting much debate about the claim’s validity.

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Invisibility Cloak

Canada’s Hyperstealth Biotechnology already manufactures camouflage uniforms for militaries across the globe.

But now, the company has patented a new “Quantum Stealth” material that disguises a military’s soldiers — or even its tanks, aircraft, and ships — by making anything behind it seem invisible.

Light Bender

Earlier in October, Hyperstealth filed a patent for the material, which doesn’t require a power source and is both paper-thin and inexpensive — all traits that could make it appealing for use on the battlefield.

Marcellus/Utica Natural Gas Resource Has Nearly Doubled Since 2012

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

USGS Estimates 214 trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas in Appalachian Basin Formations

Release Date: OCTOBER 3, 2019

The Marcellus Shale and Point Pleasant-Utica Shale formations of the Appalachian Basin contain an estimated mean of 214 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable continuous resources of natural gas, according to new USGS assessments.

“Watching our estimates for the Marcellus rise from 2 trillion to 84 trillion to 97 trillion in under 20 years demonstrates the effects American ingenuity and new technology can have,” said USGS Director Jim Reilly. “Knowing where these resources are located and how much exists is crucial to ensuring our nation’s energy independence.”

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Why the Democrats Will Lose on Climate Change

By David Middleton- Re-Blogged From WUWT

4 inconvenient truths about climate change

Noah Millman

September 7, 2019

At this week’s climate symposium on CNN, Elizabeth Warren answered a question about whether the government should be regulating lightbulbs in an interesting way. She said, basically, that we’re focusing on the wrong thing. There’s nothing wrong with more efficient lightbulbs, but it’s small beer. That’s what the fossil fuel companies want us to be arguing about, because most of the carbon is thrown up by three industries — construction, electric power, and oil — and arguing about lightbulbs takes attention away from those sectors.

The obvious inconvenient truth that Warren is pointing out here is that we aren’t going to be able to fight climate change with a series of small-change consumer choices. It’s going to require massive changes in large industries, which is a heavier political lift. Below the radar, there’s another inconvenient truth being implied: that people are really irritated by losing even small conveniences, and so focusing energy on these small-beer fights has a real cost in terms of being able to fight the bigger fights.

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Will The US Economy Fall Into Recession? Or Will It Accelerate?

By Arkadiusz Sieroń – Re-Blogged From Gold Eagle

The current economic expansion has just equaled with the longest boom in the US history. Is that not suspicious? We invite you to read our today’s article, which provide you with the valuable lessons from the 1990s expansion for the gold market and find out whether the US economy will die of old age.

Lessons from the 1990s Expansion for the Economy and the Gold Market

The current economic expansion has just equaled with the longest boom in the US history. Unless the sky falls in the next few weeks, we will celebrate a new record in July. Is that not suspicious?

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NASA is Going Green, in Space

By NASA  – Re-Blogged From WUWT

19-03528_-_gpim_final_day1

A small spacecraft the size of a mini-refrigerator is packed with cutting-edge “green” technology. NASA’s Green Propellant Infusion Mission, or GPIM, will prove a sustainable and efficient approach to spaceflight. The mission will test a low toxicity propellant and compatible systems in space for the first time.  This technology could improve the performance of future missions by providing for longer mission durations using less propellant.

In this photo, a Ball Aerospace engineer performs final checks before the spacecraft shipped to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch processing. GPIM is one of four unique NASA technology missions aboard the June 2019 SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch of the U.S. Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center’s Space Test Program-2 (STP-2).

Credits: Ball Aerospace

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Scientists Print World’s First 3D Heart

By HealthDay – Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

The world’s first complete 3D printer-generated heart, made using the patient’s own cells and materials, has been created in a lab.

Until now, success has been limited to printing only simple tissues without blood vessels.

“This is the first time anyone anywhere has successfully engineered and printed an entire heart replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers,” said team leader Tal Dvir.

The printer-generated heart is only about a third the size of an actual human heart — and it doesn’t actually work. But it’s a groundbreaking step toward engineering customized organs that can be transplanted with less risk of rejection.

Scientists Print World's First 3D Heart

A 3D printer prints a heart with human tissue during a presentation at the University of Tel Aviv in Israel. (Oded Balilty/AP)

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Nanotechnology Could Give Humans Infrared Vision

By Zoe Papadakis – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

Nanotechnology may soon give humans infrared vision, according to a new study that successfully achieved this with mice. This could open up a new door in human infrared technologies with applications extending to security and military operations, scientists from the University of Science and Technology of China said.

The study, published this week in the journal Cell, documented how mice were able to see infrared light for up to 10 weeks after being given a single injection of nanoparticles into their eyes. Humans and other mammals are only able to see certain wavelengths of light called visible light. Both ultraviolet and infrared light falls outside of this range. Infrared radiation is all around us, emitted from people, animals and objects.

Nanotechnology Could Give Humans Infrared Vision

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Should We Regulate Big Tech?

By Luigi Zingales – Re-Blogged From Imprimis & Hillsdale College

At the beginning of the twentieth century, the invention of the automobile liberated individuals from the yoke of distance. While people could travel before the invention and widespread use of the automobile, they were bound in their daily lives by the limited distance horses could cover. Railroads alleviated but did not eliminate those restrictions—movement was confined by the location of railroad tracks and by train schedules. It was only the automobile that gave individuals the freedom to move at their own leisure.

A century after the invention of the automobile, the invention of the smartphone triggered a similar revolution. And while history never repeats itself, sometimes it rhymes, and these rhymes can help us understand the present.

Before the smartphone, people were tethered to their landlines. In the 1990s, the proliferation of mobile phones and increased access to the Internet greatly expanded our freedom to communicate and our access to information. But it was the introduction of the smartphone in 2007, coupled with mobile communication and the Internet, that brought unprecedented access to information to the Western world and to a significant portion of the developing world.

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The Scientific Paper Is Obsolete

By James Somers – Re-Blogged From The Atlantic

The scientific paper—the actual form of it—was one of the enabling inventions of modernity. Before it was developed in the 1600s, results were communicated privately in letters, ephemerally in lectures, or all at once in books. There was no public forum for incremental advances. By making room for reports of single experiments or minor technical advances, journals made the chaos of science accretive. Scientists from that point forward became like the social insects: They made their progress steadily, as a buzzing mass.

The earliest papers were in some ways more readable than papers are today. They were less specialized, more direct, shorter, and far less formal. Calculus had only just been invented. Entire data sets could fit in a table on a single page. What little “computation” contributed to the results was done by hand and could be verified in the same way.

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The One-sided Worldview of Eco-Pessimists

By Joanna Szurmak and Pierre Desrochers – Re-Blogged From Quillette

The Pull of Environmental Narratives

In his critique of Hans Rosling’s optimistic take on the human condition (which Rosling co-authored with son Ola and daughter-in-law Anna Rosling Rönnlund),1 Christian Berggren scolds the late professor of international health for ignoring negative trends and for dodging the “preconditions and ecological consequences of the current techno-economic regime” as well as the risks inherent to “continued global population growth.” As Berggren further argues in the longer paper on which his Quillette essay is based, the Roslings illustrate the philosopher Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel’s apocryphal statement that “You do not see with your eyes; you see with your interests.” In this, he claims, the authors of Factfulness failed to present “the world and how it really is.”

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California Fire Crews Drink Water Pulled From Thin Air

Re-Blogged From WUWT

An Israeli company is helping America’s disaster victims and first responders

Watergen sends Israeli water-making machine to assist massive wildfires.

Abigail Klein Leichman

An emergency response vehicle (ERV) carrying an innovative Israeli machine that pulls pure drinking water directly out of ambient air is on its way to California, to provide hydration to police and firefighters dealing with the aftermath of two massive wildfires that have taken at least 87 lives and destroyed over 10,000 homes and businesses.

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Looming US Technology-Security Minerals Crisis?

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From WUWT

Impacts from the 1973 OPEC oil embargo could pale by comparison to an embargo or other disrupted access to the exotic, critical and strategic metals and minerals that are essential for energy, computer, defense and other technologies that are the foundation for virtually every facet of US economy and security. Right now, the United States imports up to 100% of those materials – and two dozen of them come 60% to 100% from China, Russia or mines controlled by those two countries.

Ironically, we likely have all of them right under our feet. But the United States is the only nation in the world that locks them up, makes them inaccessible under almost any conditions. My article lays out some of the steps that must be taken to address this untenable, unsustainable situation … and cites a new book that provides fascinating and disturbing details about it.


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Most Wear-Resistant Metal Alloy in the World

Re-Blogged From Sandia National Laboratory

If you’re ever unlucky enough to have a car with metal tires, you might consider a set made from a new alloy engineered at Sandia National Laboratories. You could skid — not drive, skid — around the Earth’s equator 500 times before wearing out the tread.

Sandia’s materials science team has engineered a platinum-gold alloy believed to be the most wear-resistant metal in the world. It’s 100 times more durable than high-strength steel, making it the first alloy, or combination of metals, in the same class as diamond and sapphire, nature’s most wear-resistant materials. Sandia’s team recently reported their findings in Advanced Materials. “We showed there’s a fundamental change you can make to some alloys that will impart this tremendous increase in performance over a broad range of real, practical metals,” said materials scientist Nic Argibay, an author on the paper.

Fighting Friction

Sandia National Laboratories researchers Michael Chandross, left, and Nic Argibay show a computer simulation used to predict the unprecedented wear resistance of their platinum-gold alloy, and an environmental tribometer used to demonstrate it. (Photo by Randy Montoya) Click on the thumbnail for a high-resolution image.

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Making Concrete From Coal Ash

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From WUWT

WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete

New coal concrete reduces energy demand, greenhouse emissions

PULLMAN, Wash. – Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation.

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Robots With Soft Hands Could Be the Future of Sustainable Production

By Carl Vause – Re-Blogged From World Economic Forum

In 2011, Professor George Whitesides of Harvard University helped rewrite the rules of what a machine could be. He developed biologically inspired ‘soft robots’, in collaboration with Harvard and the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Food handling and packaging, primarily in produce and baked items, is a highly manual process
Image: Soft Robotics

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Putting The Hype Back Into Hyperloop

By Willis Eschenbach – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

A recent article has discussed how Elon Musk’s “Boring Company” has raised $113 million dollars in startup capital. This is the company Musk formed to drill the tunnels for his proposed “Hyperloop” transportation system. It has encouraged me to discuss some of the engineering and practical problems with his LA-to-San Francisco Hyperloop proposal. The Hyperloop concept involves a windowless “pod” traveling at just below the speed of sound in a tube with all the air evacuated from it. There’s a reasonable description of the Hyperloop at Wikipedia and a much more hyper description at their website. It all sounds so good and so 21st Century, what’s not to like?

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Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found.

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Earth Day Should Celebrate “Engines and Electricity”

By Viv Forbes – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Most chapters of human history are defined by the tools and machines that were used.

In the Stone Age, the first tools were “green tools” – digging sticks, spears, boomerangs, bows and arrows made of wood; and axes, clubs, knives and grinders made of stone. These were all powered by human energy.

Then humans learned how to control fire for warmth, cooking, warfare and hunting.

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Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.

Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.

Image: Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans
(Junqiang Yan | Dreamstime)

Pet Cloning is Bringing Human Cloning a Little Bit Closer

By Antonio Regalado – Re-Blogged From MIT Technology Review

When Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she’d had her dog cloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business.

That’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse, or a top beef bull and get a living copy back in a matter of months.

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New Bionic Arm Blurs Line Between Self and Machine for Wearers

By Shelly Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

At 29 years old, Canadian firefighter Rob Anderson lost his left arm and left leg to a harrowing helicopter crash into the side of a mountain. Although fitted with “top of the line” prosthetics for the last 10 years, he said, using them feels like “doing things with a long pair of pliers.”

Part of the problem is that he just doesn’t feel connected to his prosthetic hand. “There’s a disconnect between what you’re physically touching and what your body is doing,” he explained.

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We Can Grow Vegetables in Antarctica. Next Stop: Mars

By Claudia Geib – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In the icy white desert of Antarctica, without the help of sunlight, soil, or pesticides, something green is growing.

And the scientists at Germany’s Neumayer Station III are eating well tonight.

Neumayer III’s researchers just harvested their first crop of Antarctica-grown vegetables, picked from a high-tech greenhouse that makes up the centerpiece of their “Eden ISS” project. The project is testing how plants can grow – not only in hostile places on Earth, like the poles and in deserts – but also in the inhospitable conditions of other planets (hopefully providing humans fresh vegetables when they colonize the moon, Mars, and beyond).

Neumayer Station III, where the vegetables are growing: a long, rectangular station in red, white and gray set on poles above the ice.
Neumayer Station III, where the vegetables are growing. Image Credit: Felix Riess, AWI

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How to Meet the Strategic Challenge Posed by China

By David Goldman – Re-Blogged From Hillsdale College

China poses a formidable strategic challenge to America, but we should keep in mind that it is in large part motivated by insecurity and fear. America has inherent strengths that China does not. And the greatest danger to America is not a lack of strength, but complacency.

China is a phenomenon unlike anything in economic history. The average Chinese consumes 17 times more today than in 1987. This is like the difference between driving a car and riding a bicycle or between indoor plumbing and an outhouse. In an incredibly short period of time, this formerly backward country has lifted itself into the very first rank of world economies.

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The Congo Is Set to Butt Heads With Mining Firms Over Cobalt

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • Battery producers will continue their rush to ensure continued supplies of raw materials like cobalt amid soaring demand.
  • New mining regulations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo remain in limbo, but any change to the code will result in a backlash by the many large mining operations in the country.
  • Despite the political uncertainty, Kinshasa’s role as a mineral exporter will not diminish and the government will continue to seek ways to benefit from resource wealth.

A worker at a copper and cobalt mine near Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, May 23, 2016.

(JUNIOR KANNAH/AFP/Getty Images)

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Strategic minerals – Our next energy and security crisis?

By Paul Driessen – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Foreword:

America has had its share of oil-centered energy problems and disruptions. Now it faces potential renewable energy and high technology crises, because of its heavy reliance on imports of the rare earth and other strategic minerals that are the essential building blocks for wind turbines, solar panels, computers, smart phones, medical diagnostic devices, night vision goggles, GPS and communication systems, long-life batteries and countless other applications.

The White House and Trump Administration recently launched initiatives designed to ensure access to up-to-date information on potential US and other alternative sources – and to finding safe and environmentally sound ways to find, mine, reprocess and recycle critical minerals. The goal is to emphasize sources that are less likely to come from unfriendly nations, less likely to face disruption … especially from domestic mining.

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The Shape of U.S. Restrictions on Chinese FDI

Re-Blogged From Stratfor

Highlights

  • In hopes of forcing China to open further, the United States is considering investment restrictions that would mirror those imposed by China.
  • China’s investment goals are to cement its position in the stable, developed U.S. economy and fuel growth in sectors key to its economic transition.
  • As such, China has two concerns: Sectors where its own restrictions will mean harsh U.S. measures and those sectors of high priority to Beijing.

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Resurgence of the American Coal Industry

By David Middleton -Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Is coal the new gold? A Pennsylvania senate candidate thinks so

By John Moody | Fox News

“There’s coal in them thar hills.” If that sounds like a confused reference to the 1849 California gold rush, think again. Long-ignored coal deposits in eastern Pennsylvania have become a key part of President Trump’s pledge to revitalize American mining and to once again produce critical materials needed for our national defense.

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Reservoir in Sea to End Bengaluru, India’s Drinking Water Problems?

[I was thinking that it should be possible to create a reservoir off shore, let rain fill it, and use the fresh water on shore. To the (tiny) extent that it would lower sea levels, Greens should support it. Sure enough, it’s being done (to some extent) already. -Bob]

Re-Blogged From The Times of India

BENGALURU: Could a reservoir in the Arabian Sea be the one-stop solution to harness flood waters of the Nethravathi river and end the drinking water scarcity in Bengaluru and Mangaluru? Following a report from researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru development minister K J George has instructed the city water board to look into the possibility of implementing the proposal.

T G Sitharam, senior professor at the department of civil engineering at IISc said the proposal to bring water from the west-flowing river was a sustainable water resource development strategy for Mangaluru and Bengaluru. He made a presentation of the feasibility study before George. The meeting was also attended by officials of the Bangalore Water Supply and Sewerage Board (BWSSB).

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How to Rebuild a First World Economy

By David Hunter – Re-Blogged From iPatriot

We’ve indulged in this fiction that we can build a vibrant economy by deregulating the financial sector, and cutting taxes, and putting off investments in things like infrastructure and education and our kids. But we can’t anymore. And now we have to ask the question about what really went wrong.” Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), from Rana Foroohar’s “Makers and Takers” (2016)

To solve this pressing and systemic problem, the last place to look for insight is to any big government progressive like Elizabeth Warren. Likewise, to her fellow travelers of Congress’s spendthrift establishment (of both parties). In truth, the insulated beltway bubble has no clue regarding what fundamentally remains wrong with America’s economy.

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Scientists Able to Implant Info in Monkeys’ Brains

Re-Blogged From http://www.Newsmax.com

University of Rochester neuroscientists were able to implant information into monkeys’ brains, research that could lead to brain repairs for stroke victims, according to a study published in the journal Neuron.

 The researchers sent “information directly into the premotor cortex” of two monkeys, bypassing sensory regions of the brain via electrodes.

“You could potentially bypass the damaged areas and deliver stimulation to the premotor cortex,” study co-author Kevin A. Mazurek told The New York Times. . “That could be a way to bridge parts of the brain that can no longer communicate.”

 Dr. Mazurek and Dr. Marc Schieber’s study focused on simple implants, but they are working on more complex ones, research which might help those who have suffered brain damage.

“When the computer says, ‘You’re seeing the red light,’ you could say, ‘Oh, I know what that means — I’m supposed to put my foot on the brake,'” Dr. Schieber explained to the Times. “You take information from one good part of the brain and inject it into a downstream area that tells you what to do.”

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Switchable Solar Window

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Demonstration device dynamically responds to sunlight by transforming from transparent to tinted while converting sunlight into electricity

Thermochromic windows capable of converting sunlight into electricity at a high efficiency have been developed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

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Living with the Exponential – I

By George Smith – Re-Blogged From Barbarous Relic

Before the middle of this century, the growth rates of our technology— which will be indistinguishable from ourselves— will be so steep as to appear essentially vertical. From a strictly mathematical perspective, the growth rates will still be finite but so extreme that the changes they bring about will appear to rupture the fabric of human history. That, at least, will be the perspective of unenhanced biological humanity.

Kurzweil, Ray. The Singularity Is Near: When Humans Transcend Biology, September 26, 2006

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Stem Cell Study Offers New Clues to Reversing Aging

   By Shelly Xuelai Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

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In China, Innovation Cuts Both Ways

By Matthew Bey – Re-Blogged From https://worldview.stratfor.com

China is in a bind. The heavy industry that propelled the country’s economy through three decades of dizzying growth has reached its limits. To escape the dreaded middle-income trap, China will need to shift its focus from low-end manufacturing to other economic industries, namely the technology sector. Beijing has put tech at the center of its long-term economic strategy through campaigns such as Made in China 2025 and Internet Plus. But these initiatives alone won’t push the Chinese economy past its current plateau. The tech sector is notorious for relentless innovation. And innovation requires flexibility.

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Oil Sands Crude Pellets Touted as Cure for Industry’s Transport Headaches

By The Canadian Press – Re-Blogged From BNN

CALGARY — A new technology that transforms heavy crude oil into pill-sized pellets could cure the oilsands industry’s transportation headaches, according to University of Calgary professor Ian Gates.

The newly patented technique creates self-sealing balls of bitumen of various sizes that can then be moved in coal rail cars or transport trucks with less risk of environmentally harmful spills, thus reducing the need for new pipelines, he said.

Oil Sands

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