Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Newsmax

For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found.

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Earth Day Should Celebrate “Engines and Electricity”

By Viv Forbes – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Most chapters of human history are defined by the tools and machines that were used.

In the Stone Age, the first tools were “green tools” – digging sticks, spears, boomerangs, bows and arrows made of wood; and axes, clubs, knives and grinders made of stone. These were all powered by human energy.

Then humans learned how to control fire for warmth, cooking, warfare and hunting.

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Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans

Re-Blogged From Newsmax Health

A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.

Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.

Image: Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans
(Junqiang Yan | Dreamstime)

Pet Cloning is Bringing Human Cloning a Little Bit Closer

By Antonio Regalado – Re-Blogged From MIT Technology Review

When Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she’d had her dog cloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business.

That’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse, or a top beef bull and get a living copy back in a matter of months.

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New Bionic Arm Blurs Line Between Self and Machine for Wearers

By Shelly Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

At 29 years old, Canadian firefighter Rob Anderson lost his left arm and left leg to a harrowing helicopter crash into the side of a mountain. Although fitted with “top of the line” prosthetics for the last 10 years, he said, using them feels like “doing things with a long pair of pliers.”

Part of the problem is that he just doesn’t feel connected to his prosthetic hand. “There’s a disconnect between what you’re physically touching and what your body is doing,” he explained.

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We Can Grow Vegetables in Antarctica. Next Stop: Mars

By Claudia Geib – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In the icy white desert of Antarctica, without the help of sunlight, soil, or pesticides, something green is growing.

And the scientists at Germany’s Neumayer Station III are eating well tonight.

Neumayer III’s researchers just harvested their first crop of Antarctica-grown vegetables, picked from a high-tech greenhouse that makes up the centerpiece of their “Eden ISS” project. The project is testing how plants can grow – not only in hostile places on Earth, like the poles and in deserts – but also in the inhospitable conditions of other planets (hopefully providing humans fresh vegetables when they colonize the moon, Mars, and beyond).

Neumayer Station III, where the vegetables are growing: a long, rectangular station in red, white and gray set on poles above the ice.
Neumayer Station III, where the vegetables are growing. Image Credit: Felix Riess, AWI

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How to Meet the Strategic Challenge Posed by China

By David Goldman – Re-Blogged From Hillsdale College

China poses a formidable strategic challenge to America, but we should keep in mind that it is in large part motivated by insecurity and fear. America has inherent strengths that China does not. And the greatest danger to America is not a lack of strength, but complacency.

China is a phenomenon unlike anything in economic history. The average Chinese consumes 17 times more today than in 1987. This is like the difference between driving a car and riding a bicycle or between indoor plumbing and an outhouse. In an incredibly short period of time, this formerly backward country has lifted itself into the very first rank of world economies.

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