Stem Cell Study Offers New Clues to Reversing Aging

   By Shelly Xuelai Fan – Re-Blogged From Singularity Hub

Continue reading

Advertisements

In China, Innovation Cuts Both Ways

By Matthew Bey – Re-Blogged From https://worldview.stratfor.com

China is in a bind. The heavy industry that propelled the country’s economy through three decades of dizzying growth has reached its limits. To escape the dreaded middle-income trap, China will need to shift its focus from low-end manufacturing to other economic industries, namely the technology sector. Beijing has put tech at the center of its long-term economic strategy through campaigns such as Made in China 2025 and Internet Plus. But these initiatives alone won’t push the Chinese economy past its current plateau. The tech sector is notorious for relentless innovation. And innovation requires flexibility.

Continue reading

Oil Sands Crude Pellets Touted as Cure for Industry’s Transport Headaches

By The Canadian Press – Re-Blogged From BNN

CALGARY — A new technology that transforms heavy crude oil into pill-sized pellets could cure the oilsands industry’s transportation headaches, according to University of Calgary professor Ian Gates.

The newly patented technique creates self-sealing balls of bitumen of various sizes that can then be moved in coal rail cars or transport trucks with less risk of environmentally harmful spills, thus reducing the need for new pipelines, he said.

Oil Sands

Continue reading

New Solar Cell Design is Modeled After Bugs Eyes

By Anthony Watts – Re-Blogged From http://www.WattsUpWithThat.com

Insect eyes inspire new solar cell design from Stanford

Packing tiny solar cells together, like micro-lenses in the compound eye of an insect, could pave the way to a new generation of advanced photovoltaics, say Stanford University scientists.

Schematic of a compound solar cell, where a hexagonal scaffold (gray) is used to partition perovskite (black) into microcells to provide mechanical and chemical stability. CREDIT Courtesy: Dauskardt Lab/Stanford University

Continue reading

A Study on the Design Possibilities Enabled by Rope-Less, Non-Vertical Elevators Project

From the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

Project Started: September 2016
Anticipated Project Completion: September 2018
Funding Sponsor: thyssenkrupp AG
Principal Investigators: Dario Trabucco, CTBUH and Antony Wood, CTBUH
The CTBUH research project, “A Study on the Design Possibilities Enabled by Rope-less, Non-vertical Elevators,” has received $264,000 in funding from thyssenkrupp AG to embark on an ambitious 24-month comprehensive study. The research will investigate how technological innovation in elevators, specifically rope-less non-vertical cabins, could impact the design outcomes of tall buildings and cities. The study seeks to remove the evolutionary bottleneck created by exclusively vertical elevator systems, as conventional systems to date have limited the height and influenced the shape of skyscrapers, which have historically been designed as a vertical repetition of floors.

To support this research, a Steering Committee and various Expert Panels were formed, which will be crucial for generating and evaluating the final results of this research.

Funding Sponsor
  Continue reading

Tech Experts Disagree Wildly on the Future Impact of AI

By Tom Ward – Re-Blogged From Futurism

In Brief
  • Elon Musk has given a doomsday prophecy on the topic of AI, going as far as to invest $1 billion into researching how to use it safely.
  • Other experts have different perspectives on the future of AI, but all are agreed that this is an important topic, and how we use this powerful technology must be thoroughly thought through.

The AI Debate

Our technology prophets are talking in the lexicon of magic, gods, and monsters when it comes to artificial intelligence (AI). They predict every scenario from utopias to apocalypses, overlords to angels.

Continue reading

Scientists Are Using CRISPR To “Program” Living Cells

By Dom Galeon – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Scientists from the University of Washington have constructed digital logic gates in living cells. Though they’re not the first to do so, the researchers’ living circuitry is the largest and most complex of any created thus far.

Living Circuits

Thanks to projects like Elon Musk’s Neuralink, a future in which humankind merges with machines is on everyone’s minds. While a brain computer interface (BCI) like the one Musk is proposing would involve making a computer function as part of a human body, other researchers are taking an opposite route. Instead of making machines that can imitate biology, they’re looking for ways to make biological systems function more like computers.

Continue reading