Panasonic’s VR Glasses Are Unlike Any You’ve Seen Before

Steampunk VR

Virtual reality headsets might soon become far less cumbersome.

At this year’s Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Japanese electronics corporation Panasonic showed off a VR glasses prototype that looks like something out of a 90s steampunk movie, The Verge reports.

The glasses feature some impressive specs: high resolution micro OLED panels for each eye and support for HDR— high dynamic range technology that’s usually limited to monitors and TVs. In a statement, Panasonic claims the glasses are the world’s first HDR-enabled VR unit.

This Clever Car Add-On Uses AI to Block Out Just The Sun

Sun Blind

German engineering company Bosch has come up with a clever new automotive sun visor that uses an LCD panel and artificial intelligence to block out only the Sun in the driver’s vision.

The idea is to give them an unobstructed view of the road ahead when the sun is low in the sky. Each year, thousands of car accidents are related to sun glare, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

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Here’s How an Iranian Cyberattack Could Affect You

By Kristin Houser

The nation could attempt to take out American power grids — but probably won’t.

Almost immediately after the United States killed Iran’s top military general Qassim Suleimani, the Middle Eastern nation vowed to carry out “crushing revenge” for the slaying.

The internet took that to mean World War III was imminent — but it might not be a physical battle that the average American needs to worry about so much as a cyber one.

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How Watching TV Will Change in the 2020s

By Associated Press – Re-Blogged From Headline Wealth

What will watching TV be like in the 2020s? Amid new gadgets and glitz, the CES tech show in Las Vegas aims to offer some answers, many of which boil down to more streaming and more efforts to glue you to your phone.

The show’s keynote addresses, once dominated by computer and chip makers, will this year feature executives from TV networks NBC and CBS and upstart video services like mobile-focused Quibi and free streamer Tubi. Topic one will be the streaming wars — not to mention mounting costs for consumers who want access to everything — as giants NBC Universal and WarnerMedia prepare to join the clash with Netflix later this year.

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The Elderly in Japan are Using Exoskeletons to Delay Retirement

By Victor Tangermann – Re-Blogged From Futurism
“The father is in his 70s and was supposed to retire but is still working with our muscle suit.”

Exoskeletons aren’t just for super soldiers, automotive assembly workers and the paralyzed — they can assist the elderly in everyday tasks as well.

Now, New Scientist reports that older folks in Japan are using exoskeletons to help them do their jobs as they spend more of their lives in the workforce.

Japan currently has one of the oldest populations int he world. According to the U.S. Population Reference Bureau, Japan has the highest share of people above the age of 65 of any country — 26 percent, according to 2015 data.

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New Way to Remove Carbon Dioxide from Air

By Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The process could work on the gas at any concentrations, from power plant emissions to open air

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

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Air Force New Laser Cannon

The U.S. Air Force finally has its hands on the laser cannon that military tech contractor Raytheon built for it.

The laser weapon, which can be mounted onto the back of a vehicle, is designed to help the Air Force take down hostile drones, Engadget reports. While the military will spend another year testing the cannon, the delivery represents an escalation in the arms race as more countries work to develop dangerous lasers.

Trial Period

The Air Force will test out the cannon in real-world scenarios overseas for the next year, though it’s not clear how that’s distinct from active deployment.