New Way to Remove Carbon Dioxide from Air

By Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Re-Blogged From WUWT

The process could work on the gas at any concentrations, from power plant emissions to open air

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

A flow of air or flue gas (blue) containing carbon dioxide (red) enters the system from the left. As it passes between the thin battery electrode plates, carbon dioxide attaches to the charged plates while the cleaned airstream passes on through and exits at right. Credit: Sahag Voskian and T. Alan Hatton

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Air Force New Laser Cannon

The U.S. Air Force finally has its hands on the laser cannon that military tech contractor Raytheon built for it.

The laser weapon, which can be mounted onto the back of a vehicle, is designed to help the Air Force take down hostile drones, Engadget reports. While the military will spend another year testing the cannon, the delivery represents an escalation in the arms race as more countries work to develop dangerous lasers.

Trial Period

The Air Force will test out the cannon in real-world scenarios overseas for the next year, though it’s not clear how that’s distinct from active deployment.

Nanoparticle Tech Reduces Celiac Disease Symptoms by 90%

By Kristin Houser – Re-Blogged From Futurism

Let them eat cake. And bread. And…

People with celiac disease have two options in life, neither of which is ideal.

Because their immune systems can’t tolerate gluten, they can choose to never eat the many delicious foods containing it. Boring.

Or they can devour all the cake, bread, and beer they want — but resign themselves to abdominal pain, diarrhea, and other nasty side effects when their immune systems trigger an inflammation response in their small intestines.

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Quantum Supremacy

Rumors have been circulating for weeks that tech megacorporation Google has achieved quantum supremacy, meaning it’s used an experimental quantum computer to perform a calculation significantly faster than a regular binary computer.

In a mysterious paper spotted by the Financial Times on NASA’s Technical Reports Server in September, Google researchers claimed to have beaten a supercomputer by a wide margin. But the paper was quickly deleted, prompting much debate about the claim’s validity.

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Invisibility Cloak

Canada’s Hyperstealth Biotechnology already manufactures camouflage uniforms for militaries across the globe.

But now, the company has patented a new “Quantum Stealth” material that disguises a military’s soldiers — or even its tanks, aircraft, and ships — by making anything behind it seem invisible.

Light Bender

Earlier in October, Hyperstealth filed a patent for the material, which doesn’t require a power source and is both paper-thin and inexpensive — all traits that could make it appealing for use on the battlefield.

Marcellus/Utica Natural Gas Resource Has Nearly Doubled Since 2012

By David Middleton – Re-Blogged From WUWT

USGS Estimates 214 trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas in Appalachian Basin Formations

Release Date: OCTOBER 3, 2019

The Marcellus Shale and Point Pleasant-Utica Shale formations of the Appalachian Basin contain an estimated mean of 214 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered, technically recoverable continuous resources of natural gas, according to new USGS assessments.

“Watching our estimates for the Marcellus rise from 2 trillion to 84 trillion to 97 trillion in under 20 years demonstrates the effects American ingenuity and new technology can have,” said USGS Director Jim Reilly. “Knowing where these resources are located and how much exists is crucial to ensuring our nation’s energy independence.”

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Why the Democrats Will Lose on Climate Change

By David Middleton- Re-Blogged From WUWT

4 inconvenient truths about climate change

Noah Millman

September 7, 2019

At this week’s climate symposium on CNN, Elizabeth Warren answered a question about whether the government should be regulating lightbulbs in an interesting way. She said, basically, that we’re focusing on the wrong thing. There’s nothing wrong with more efficient lightbulbs, but it’s small beer. That’s what the fossil fuel companies want us to be arguing about, because most of the carbon is thrown up by three industries — construction, electric power, and oil — and arguing about lightbulbs takes attention away from those sectors.

The obvious inconvenient truth that Warren is pointing out here is that we aren’t going to be able to fight climate change with a series of small-change consumer choices. It’s going to require massive changes in large industries, which is a heavier political lift. Below the radar, there’s another inconvenient truth being implied: that people are really irritated by losing even small conveniences, and so focusing energy on these small-beer fights has a real cost in terms of being able to fight the bigger fights.

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